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public class SuperClass
{
    public void method1()
    {
        System.out.println("superclass method1");
        this.method2();
    }

    public void method2()
    {
        System.out.println("superclass method2");
    }

}

public class SubClass extends SuperClass
{
    @Override
    public void method1()
    {
        System.out.println("subclass method1");
        super.method1();
    }

    @Override
    public void method2()
    {
        System.out.println("subclass method2");
    }
}



public class Demo 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        SubClass mSubClass = new SubClass();
        mSubClass.method1();
    }
}

my expected output:

subclass method1
superclass method1
superclass method2

actual output:

subclass method1
superclass method1
subclass method2

I know technically I have overriden a public method, but I figured that because I was calling the super, any calls within the super would stay in the super, this isn't happening. Any ideas as to how I can make it happen?

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1  
I suspect you might want to "prefer composition over inheritance". –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 4 '11 at 16:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The keyword super doesn't "stick". Every method call is handled individually, so even if you got to SuperClass.method1() by calling super, that doesn't influence any other method call that you might make in the future.

That means there is no direct way to call SuperClass.method2() from SuperClass.method1() without going though SubClass.method2() unless you're working with an actual instance of SuperClass.

You can't even achieve the desired effect using Reflection (see the documentation of java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Object, Object...)).

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could someone please upload a diagram of this(pun intended) going through the stack? thanks in advance! –  laycat Apr 16 at 13:39
1  
@laycat: There is no need for a diagram. Just remember that Java has no "memory" for super. Every time it calls a method, it will look at the instance type, and start searching for the method with this type, no matter how often you called super. So when you call method2 on an instance of SubClass, it will always see the one from SubClass first. –  Aaron Digulla Apr 16 at 15:39

You can only access overridden methods in the overriding methods (or in other methods of the overriding class).

So: either don't override method2() or call super.method2() inside the overridden version.

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You're using the this keyword which actually refers to the "currently running instance of the object you're using", that is, you're invoking this.method2(); on your superclass, that is, it will call the method2() on the object you're using, which is the SubClass.

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7  
true, and not using this won't help either. An unqualified invocation implicitly uses this –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 4 '11 at 15:59
2  
Why is this getting upvoted? This is not the answer to this question. When you write method2() the compiler will see this.method2(). So even if you remove the this it still will not work. What @Sean Patrick Floyd is saying is correct –  Shervin Jan 4 '11 at 16:01
2  
@Shervin he's not saying anything wrong, he's just not making clear what happens if you leave out this –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 4 '11 at 16:04
3  
The answer is right in pointing out that this refers to the "concrete running instance class" (known in runtime) and not (as the poster seems to believe) to the "current compilation-unit class" (where the keyword is used, known in compile time). But it can also be misleading (as Shervin points) : this is also referenced implicitly with the plain method call; method2(); is the same as this.method2(); –  leonbloy Jan 4 '11 at 16:16

If you don't want superClass.method1 to call subClass.method2, make method2 private so it cannot be overridden.

Here's a suggestion:

public class SuperClass {

  public void method1() {
    System.out.println("superclass method1");
    this.internalMethod2();
  }

  public void method2()  {
    // this method can be overridden.  
    // It can still be invoked by a childclass using super
    internalMethod2();
  }

  private void internalMethod2()  {
    // this one cannot.  Call this one if you want to be sure to use
    // this implementation.
    System.out.println("superclass method2");
  }

}

public class SubClass extends SuperClass {

  @Override
  public void method1() {
    System.out.println("subclass method1");
    super.method1();
  }

  @Override
  public void method2() {
    System.out.println("subclass method2");
  }
}

If it didn't work this way, polymorphism would be impossible (or at least not even half as useful).

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I don't believe you can do it directly. One workaround would be to have a private internal implementation of method2 in the superclass, and call that. For example:

public class SuperClass
{
    public void method1()
    {
        System.out.println("superclass method1");
        this.internalMethod2();
    }

    public void method2()
    {
        this.internalMethod2(); 
    }
    private void internalMethod2()
    {
        System.out.println("superclass method2");
    }

}
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"this" keyword refers to current class reference. That means, when it is used inside the method, the 'current' class is still SubClass and so, the answer is explained.

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