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I have used sendInput() under xp 32bits using webservices to push F5 of current focused windows. Now under Vista win64 i can´t obtain this result. Some articles point uint problems using 4bits or 8bits but this is not fixing the problem under vista with differential compilation and FieldOffset(4)or(8). Others speak about no more interaction beetween Vista screen and the window using this SendInput() method. Can someone point the solution to push F5 in win32 and win64 machines. Thanks.

uint intReturn = 0;
NativeWIN32.INPUT structInput;
structInput = new NativeWIN32.INPUT();
structInput.type = (uint)1;
structInput.ki.wScan = 0;
structInput.ki.time = 0;
structInput.ki.dwFlags = 0;
structInput.ki.dwExtraInfo = IntPtr.Zero; 

// Key down the actual key-code 
structInput.ki.wVk = (ushort)NativeWIN32.VK.F5;
//vk; 
intReturn = NativeWIN32.SendInput((uint)1, ref structInput, Marshal.SizeOf(structInput));
// Key up the actual key-code 
structInput.ki.dwFlags = NativeWIN32.KEYEVENTF_KEYUP;
structInput.ki.wVk = (ushort)NativeWIN32.VK.F5;
//vk; 
intReturn = NativeWIN32.SendInput((uint)1, ref structInput, Marshal.SizeOf(structInput));



public class NativeWIN32
{ 
    public const ushort KEYEVENTF_KEYUP = 0x0002; 
    public enum VK : ushort 
    {  
        F5                   = 0x74,  
    } 

    public struct KEYBDINPUT 
    {  
        public ushort wVk;  
        public ushort wScan;  
        public uint dwFlags;  
        public long time;  
        public uint dwExtraInfo; 
    }; 
    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit,Size=28)]  
    public struct INPUT 
    {  
        [FieldOffset(0)] 
        public uint type;
        #if x86 
    //32bit 
    [FieldOffset(4)] 
        #else
        //64bit 
        [FieldOffset(8)]
        #endif
        public KEYBDINPUT ki; 
    };

    [DllImport("user32.dll")] 
    public static extern uint SendInput(uint nInputs, ref INPUT pInputs, int cbSize);

}

share|improve this question
    
Please show us your declarations. –  SLaks Jan 4 '11 at 16:58
2  
Action: push F5 from webapplication under Vista64 and after from Win7-64. –  user325558 Jan 4 '11 at 17:38
1  
This guy seems to have gotten it to work. social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/windowscompatibility/thread/… –  Brandon Boone Jan 4 '11 at 17:52
    
Interesting Brandon, but in this code i use conditional structure of Input to manage this problem like guys but still not working. –  user325558 Jan 4 '11 at 18:22
1  
That #if won't work. –  SLaks Jan 4 '11 at 23:42

2 Answers 2

I ran into this problem with 32/64 on XP and this is the solution I came up with. I'm not a pInvoke expert, so there may be a more elegant solution.

The root cause seems to be that word size is different between the two architectures. This throws off where some of the complex data gets parsed out of the data structures used in the external call. I had to declare two separate sets of structures and external calls for 64 bit and 32 bit.

internal static class SendInputExternalCalls
{
    // This SendInput call uses the 32bit input structure.
    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true, EntryPoint = "SendInput")]
    public static extern UInt32 SendInput(
        UInt32 numInputs,
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPArray, SizeConst = 1)]
        SEND_INPUT_FOR_32_BIT[] sendInputsFor,
        Int32 cbSize);

    // This SendInput call uses the 64bit input structure.
    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true, EntryPoint = "SendInput")]
    public static extern UInt32 SendInput(
        UInt32 numInputs,
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPArray, SizeConst = 1)] 
        SEND_INPUT_FOR_64_BIT[] sendInputsFor,
        Int32 cbSize);
}

// This is the basic structure for 32 bit input.  SendInput allows for other input   
// types, but I was only concerned with keyboard input, so I harcoded my strucs that way.
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, Pack = 1)]
internal struct SEND_INPUT_FOR_32_BIT
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public uint InputType;  
    [FieldOffset(4)]
    public KEYBOARD_INPUT_FOR_32_BIT KeyboardInputStruct; 
}

// Here is the structure for keyboard input.  The key code, scan code, and flags
// are what's important.  The other variables are place holders so that the structure
// maintains the correct size when compared to the other possible input structure types.  
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)]
internal struct KEYBOARD_INPUT_FOR_32_BIT
{
    public ushort VirtualKeyCode;
    public ushort ScanCode;
    public uint Flags;
    public uint Time;
    public uint ExtraInfo;
    public uint Padding1;
    public uint Padding2;
}

// Here's the corresponding 64 bit structure.  Notice that the field offset are larger. 
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, Pack = 1)]
internal struct SEND_INPUT_FOR_64_BIT
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public uint InputType;
    [FieldOffset(8)]
    public KEYBOARD_INPUT_FOR_64_BIT KeyboardInputStruct;
}

// Here's the keyboard 64 bit structure.  Notice that the field offset are again larger.
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit, Pack = 1)]
internal struct KEYBOARD_INPUT_FOR_64_BIT
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public ushort VirtualKeyCode;
    [FieldOffset(2)]
    public ushort ScanCode;
    [FieldOffset(4)]
    public uint Flags;
    [FieldOffset(12)]
    public uint Time;
    [FieldOffset(20)]
    public uint Padding1;
    [FieldOffset(28)]
    public uint Padding2;
} 

Here comes the slightly kludgy part. Which structure to use is determined by the architecture the app runs on. You can compile for a 32 or 64 bit target, but you can still run a 32 bit compiled app on 64 bit Windows. If you want your 32 bit compiled app to use SendInput on a 64 bit machine you have to figure out which struct to use at run time. I did this by checking the word size when my public method to send input was called.

    public static void SendInput( ushort charUnicode )
    {
        // In 32 bit the IntPtr should be 4; it's 8 in 64 bit.
        if (Marshal.SizeOf(new IntPtr()) == 8)
        {
            SendInput64(charUnicode);
        }
        else
        {
            SendInput32(charUnicode);
        }
    }

I haven't tried this in Vista, but it works in 32/64 Windows XP and 32/64 Windows 7.

share|improve this answer
    
An easier solution is explained on pinvoke.net, where the union is placed in a separate structure, to automatically solve this alignment issue: "By separating the union into its own structure, rather than placing the mi, ki and hi fields directly in the INPUT structure, we assure that the .Net structure will have the correct alignment on both 32 and 64 bit." –  Steven Jeuris May 15 '13 at 14:13
    
Where are the SendInput64(char whatever) and SendInput32(char whatever) methods? –  reggaeguitar Apr 15 at 19:07
    
@reggaeguitar I didn't list them, but they are really simple. They are just helper methods that make the external call with the appropriate structure for the bittedness of the system. –  CaulynDarr Apr 16 at 11:22

Compile your project for 32 bit would fix this. Please refer to : http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-SG/Vsexpressvb/thread/69e5529e-372b-4d70-bb94-556507a2358e

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not a solution to the problem. This is just a nonsense workaround. –  alexandrudicu Feb 4 '13 at 9:09

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