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We have a customer who does {something} and after that some of our sequences are returning numbers that have already been used. While the long term answer would be for them to stop doing {something}, I need a simple way to check the sequences against the tables they are used in.

I can query user_sequences to get the last_number for each sequence and I can get the max(id_number) for each table. But when I try to do both in the same query I get nulls back.

My broken sql is
select max(last_number) , max(id_number) from user_sequences, squiggly.ACCOUNT_CODE_DEFINITION where sequence_name = 'ACCOUNT_CODE_DEFINITION_SEQ' and sequence_owner = 'SQUIGGLY' ;

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I hate it when customers do {something}. And they lack a reason why they do it! –  Adam Hawkes Jan 4 '11 at 17:15
1  
Perhaps you could do {something} to the customer, repeatedly, until they stop doing {something}. –  Jeffrey Kemp Oct 18 '12 at 7:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you can get the MAX from both tables with this query:

SELECT (SELECT last_number
          FROM all_sequences
         WHERE sequence_name = 'ACCOUNT_CODE_DEFINITION_SEQ'
           AND sequence_owner = 'SQUIGGLY') max_sequence,
       (SELECT MAX(id_number) 
          FROM squiggly.ACCOUNT_CODE_DEFINITION) max_id_number
  FROM dual
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Thanks Vincent, that was exactly what I needed. –  Jon Strayer Jan 4 '11 at 19:28
    
There can't be more than one sequence with the same name and owner - no need for MAX for last_number. –  Jeffrey Kemp Oct 18 '12 at 7:21
    
So they will return the same answer ? :) corrected –  Vincent Malgrat Oct 18 '12 at 7:52

I would suggest never trust "last_number" of user_sequences because if Cache is enabled while creating the sequence , then the last_number is likely to contain a value greater than current value of the sequence.

Well ,i used below steps

1) select <seq_name>.nextval from dual;

2) select <seq_name>.currval from dual;

Since u can't execute currval alone for the first time , so i executed nextval first.

SQL> create sequence seq;

Sequence created.

SQL> select last_number from user_sequences;

LAST_NUMBER
-----------
          1

SQL> select seq.nextval from dual;

   NEXTVAL
----------
         1

SQL> select seq.currval from dual;

   CURRVAL
----------
         1

SQL> select last_number from user_sequences;

LAST_NUMBER
-----------
         21

SQL> select seq.currval from dual;

   CURRVAL
----------
         1
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1  
If gaps in the sequence cause problems, then there's already something wrong in the design of the application. –  Jeffrey Kemp Oct 18 '12 at 7:20

seq.nextval will work but also increment the sequence. If you already called nextval in the current session you can call seq.currval.

If you call currval before you call nextval it will throw an exception.

I would do:
select last_number from user_sequences where sequence_name = 'seq'

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try to use seq.nextval :)

Look here : http://www.techonthenet.com/oracle/sequences.php

It's not a good pratice to use the Max (in case of the last row have beed deleted !).

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1  
-1: NEXTVAL will advance the sequence -- you want to use CURRVAL, but that doesn't mean someone didn't execute something to advance the sequence around the same time. –  OMG Ponies Jan 4 '11 at 18:38

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