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I'm coming to learn Perl from a Python background where the following hash-to-string conversion is built in to the language:

>>> d = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
>>> str(d)
"{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}"

Is there a builtin and/or module that has a subroutine with output along the lines of:

"('a' => 1, 'b' => 2, 'c' => 3)"

Strangely, a web search for perl "hash to string" doesn't turn up anything along the lines I'm looking for. Thanks!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 35 down vote accepted
use Data::Dumper;
local $Data::Dumper::Terse = 1;
my $str = Dumper({a => 1, b => 2, c => 3});
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1  

See also JSON:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings; use strict;
use JSON;

my $data = {a => 1, b=> 2, c => 3};

print to_json($data);

This produces:

{"c":3,"a":1,"b":2}
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3  
+1 While it seems Data::Dumper was voted answer, I think the JSON approach deserves as much recognition for a very simple hash to string. –  Andrew Finnell May 20 '11 at 16:36
3  
Though the original question doesn't imply this is a concern, JSON::to_json is fast, so if you're needing to serialise a lot of things, this could be a significantly better answer than Data::Dumper. ( doppnet.com/2011/03/how-to-gain-24861-performance-boost-in-perl ) –  bigiain Nov 3 '11 at 1:02

There is the Data::Dumper module which one way to do this sort of transformation.

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Yes, but it does prepend a $VAR1 = before the string. –  Leon Timmermans Jan 20 '09 at 0:04
    
That's true, annoying but tractable. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 20 '09 at 0:06
    
Justed found the solution to that... –  Leon Timmermans Jan 20 '09 at 0:07
    
Use Data::Dump instead. It's Data::Dumper done right. –  j_random_hacker Jan 20 '09 at 13:04

Use Data::Dump instead of Data::Dumper. It's basically the same, except without that annoying $VAR1 = ... cruft:

use Data::Dump "pp";
print pp({a => 1, b => 2, c => 3});

Produces:

{ a => 1, b => 2, c => 3 }

If you're on Windows, Data::Dump has come pre-installed with ActivePerl since version 5.8.

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Can't locate Data/Dump.pm in @INC - it is not standard library. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 20 '09 at 13:30
    
On ActivePerl 5.10, build 1004, Data::Dump 1.08 came pre-installed. –  Kev Jan 20 '09 at 13:38
    
+1, I hadn't realized this module exists BTW. It lacks certain add-ons like HTML formatting, but oh well. –  Kev Jan 20 '09 at 13:48
    
Kev: Are you saying that good ol' Data::Dumper can produce HTML-formatted output? If so that's pretty cool... –  j_random_hacker Jan 20 '09 at 14:01

Yet Another Swallow Solution:

sub pp {
  my $h = shift();
  qq[{${\(join',',map"$_=>$h->{$_}",keys%$h)}}]
}
print pp({a => 1, b => 2, c => 3});

But use Data::Dumper instead.

For very fancy output you can use also:

use Data::Dumper;
use Perl::Tidy;
sub pp {
        local $Data::Dumper::Terse    = 1;
        local $Data::Dumper::Indent   = 0;
        my $source = Dumper(@_);
        my $result;
        Perl::Tidy::perltidy(
                source      => \$source,
                destination => \$result,
                argv        => [qw(-pbp -nst)]
        );
        return $result;
}

If you prefer some keys should be first than you can use this approach (i want type first and position second):

    local $Data::Dumper::Sortkeys = sub {
            [   sort {
                            if    ( $b eq 'type' )     {1}
                            elsif ( $a eq 'type' )     {-1}
                            elsif ( $b eq 'position' ) {1}
                            elsif ( $a eq 'position' ) {-1}
                            else                       { $a cmp $b }
                            } keys %{ $_[0] }
            ];
    };
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Several of the above solutions have a problem if you have the potential for multi-level structures.

Specifically this flag:

$Data::Dumper::Terse    = 1;

As noted on the perldoc page for Data::Dumper, the "terse" flag could general not perl parseable output.

If you possibly are going to have multi-depth structures the proper thing to do would be to instead use:

$Data::Dumper::Indent = 0;

Which is guaranteed to be perl parseable by eval, which makes for a very very easy way of doing serialization to plaintext...

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