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Throughout our program, forms are opened like this:

FormName.SomeValue = 10
FormName.ShowDialog()

rather than the usual

Dim myForm As New FormName
myForm.SomeValue = 10
myForm.ShowDialog()

(There is nothing we could do about this - this was done automatically by the Visual Studio VB6 --> VB.Net converter)

The problem is that when forms are closed, they seem to not really be closed, only hidden - if I add some text to a textbox and close/reopen the form, the text is still there, rather than the textbox being cleared like normal. This is presumably because the form always uses the same instance.

Is there any easy way to fix this other than going through the entire program and creating a new form instance for every ShowDialog() call (there are hundreds)?

We considered resetting every control in every form's Load event, but that would still be a pain, so we figured we'd ask if there's a simpler way first.

share|improve this question
1  
You are going to have to edit the code and call Dispose() after the ShowDialog() call. Using the Using statement is better. While you're at it, getting rid of the horrid VB6 'type name = object reference' habit is a good idea. It blows up bad whenever you start using threads. – Hans Passant Jan 4 '11 at 19:01
    
@Hans: I have no idea what habit you're talking about, I come from a C# world. I've never done any VB6. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 4 '11 at 19:08
    
My condolences. Search the code base for DoEvents and SendKeys to see what you're up against. – Hans Passant Jan 4 '11 at 19:13
1  
What you are dealing with is called the form's "default instance" and is a carry over from the VB6 days. It is not recommended practice to use it. You may not want to hear it, but the best long-term strategy for your code base is to rewrite the form initializers the correct way than to do some hacky workaround in the form Load() events. You may hate it now, but you will appreciate it the next time you have to work on this code. You can probably even put together a snippet to do most of the typing for you. – Steve Massing Jan 6 '11 at 0:10
    
@Steve: Thank you for the information and advice; that is the same realization I came to, so that is what I ended up doing (it took about 2 hours..). If you make that an answer, I will accept it. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 6 '11 at 16:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are dealing with is called the form's "default instance" and is a carry over from the VB6 days. It is not recommended practice to use it. You may not want to hear it, but the best long-term strategy for your code base is to rewrite the form initializers the correct way than to do some hacky workaround in the form Load() events. You may hate it now, but you will appreciate it the next time you have to work on this code. You can probably even put together a snippet to do most of the typing for you.

share|improve this answer
public class MyForm: Form{

   private static MyForm myForm = null;

   public static DialogResult ShowDialog(bool newForm){
          if(newForm)
          {
                if(myForm != null) 
                    myForm.Dispose();
                myForm= new MyForm();
          }
          return myForm.ShowDialog();
   }

   public static DialogResult ShowDialog(){
          return ShowDialog(true);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is VB.Net, not C#. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 4 '11 at 19:00
2  
concepts does not have languages :) – hungryMind Jan 4 '11 at 19:11
    
This should work in VB, everything can be converted to VB quite easily. – Meta-Knight Jan 4 '11 at 19:24

Edit: How to display the form using the Using statement

Using formName AS New FormName
    formName.SomeValue = 10
    formName.ShowDialog()
End Using

It appears from the code displayed here that there is now a static ShowDialog call that was added to your FormName class. You should be able to edit just this method to dispose of the old form and create and display the new one. This would help you avoid changing code all over the place, just in the one location.

share|improve this answer
    
This is VB.Net, not C#. In VB.Net, unlike C#, you can apparently reference an automatically-created global instance of any form using the form's class's name. I don't know what this is called, so I don't know what to google for this problem. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 4 '11 at 18:59
    
My bad, didn't realize that VB did that. If this is the case, then you are going to need to follow @Hans comment. You need to add dispose calls, and I would recommend doing that via a Using statement. – pstrjds Jan 4 '11 at 19:06
    
@your edit: Yes, I already mentioned we could replace every invocation of ShowDialog() in the program, but that would be a huge hassle. Also, Using is not necessary for Forms as they are automatically disposed of when they are closed. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 4 '11 at 19:12
    
@Blue I know you don't want to change the code, but you are going to have to - code migration is not always "automagic". Forms are not automatically disposed when they are closed, you have to dispose of them manually. If they were disposed then you could not guarantee access to the properties of the dialog after it was closed (i.e. open file dialog). – pstrjds Jan 4 '11 at 19:20
    
@pstrjds: Dispose is not the same as garbage collected :) Dispose is indeed called when the form is closed; see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aw58wzka.aspx – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 4 '11 at 19:26
  1. If the question is about clearing text boxes then I would have Cleared all of them RECURSIVELY

      For Each Control in Controls
          If Control is type of TextBox
          Control.Clear
      Next
    
  2. If you are binding controls by any DATASOURCE I would suggest to clear the Datasource and REBIND

  3. Override the ShowDialog() Method.
share|improve this answer

You asked for easy way to fix this:

Change your ShowDialog() procedure/function calls in the following way:


   AS PROCEDURE                       |   AS FUNCTION
                                      | 
    FormName.ShowDialog()             |    r = FormName.ShowDialog()
    FormName.ShowDialog()             |    r = FormName.ShowDialog()
                                      |
   CHANGE TO                          |   CHANGE TO
                                      |
    Call New FormName.ShowDialog()    |    r = New FormName.ShowDialog()
    Call New FormName.ShowDialog()    |    r = New FormName.ShowDialog()

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