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I'm trying to display a UIAlertView after some time (like 5 minutes after doing something in the app). I'm already notifying the user if the app is closed or in background. But I want to display a UIAlertView while the app is running.

I tried to dispatch_async as follows but the alert is popping forever:

[NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:minutes];
 dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(),
       ^{
        UIAlertView * alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"title!" message:@"message!" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel" otherButtonTitles:nil];
        [alert show];
        [alert release];
       }
       );

Also, I read that the thread dies after 30 to 60 minutes. I want to be able to display the alert after more than 60 min.

share|improve this question
    
I'm intrigued, where did you read thread dies after 30 to 60 minutes? – Grzegorz Adam Hankiewicz Jun 3 '12 at 7:34
    
I can't really find where i read it, but i believe i did. I will test it tomorrow and get back to you. – Basel Abdelaziz Jun 3 '12 at 22:07
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Why not use an NSTimer, why would you need to use GCD in this case?

[NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:5*60 target:self selector:@selector(showAlert:) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];

Then, within the same class, you'd have something like this:

- (void) showAlert:(NSTimer *) timer {
    UIAlertView * alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"title!" 
                                                     message:@"message!" 
                                                    delegate:self               
                                           cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel"
                                           otherButtonTitles:nil];
    [alert show];
    [alert release];
}

Also, as @PeyloW noted, you can use performSelector:withObject:afterDelay: too:

UIAlertView * alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"title!" 
                                                 message:@"message!" 
                                                delegate:self               
                                       cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel"
                                       otherButtonTitles:nil];
[alert performSelector:@selector(show) withObject:nil afterDelay:5*60];
[alert release];

EDIT You can now also use GCD's dispatch_after API:

double delayInSeconds = 5;
dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, delayInSeconds * NSEC_PER_SEC);
dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^(void){
    UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"title!"
                                                        message:@"message"
                                                       delegate:self
                                              cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel"
                                              otherButtonTitles:nil];
    [alertView show];
    [alertView release]; //Obviously you should not call this if you're using ARC
});
share|improve this answer
    
Or simply use performSelector:withObject:afterDelay:, and you won't need to mess with a timer either. Fact is you can call the show method on the UIAlertView and no need for a second method either. – PeyloW Jan 4 '11 at 21:22
    
@PeyloW Good point, although you may run into race conditions with that as (i think) performSelector:withObject:afterDelay: actually performs the selector on a secondary thread. Also, when would you release it? The autorelease pool may deallocate the UIAlertView object before it has a chance to perform the show selector. I think it's worth it to use a NSTimer in this case. – Jacob Relkin Jan 4 '11 at 21:26
3  
performSelector:withObject:afterDelay: will always perform the selector on the current thread, and the object is retained by the current run-loop until it is performed (or cancelled). In practice a timer is implicitly created. The API would be pretty useless and not conforming to Cocoa memory management rules otherwise. So both if your fears are baseless. – PeyloW Jan 4 '11 at 21:43
    
@PeyloW That actually makes a lot of sense - I learned something new today, thanks! – Jacob Relkin Jan 4 '11 at 21:44
    
Thank you. I totally missed that. – Basel Abdelaziz Jan 6 '11 at 17:29

This is the kind of thing that Local Notifications were created for. You can set an UIAlertView-like notification to come up some time in the future, even if your app is backgrounded or not running at all.

Here is a tutorial.

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