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When running a script via sudo or su I want to get the original user. This should happen regardless of multiple sudo or su runs inside of each other and specifically sudo su -.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Results:

Use who am i | awk '{print $1}' OR logname as no other methods are guaranteed.

Logged in as self:

evan> echo $USER
evan
evan> echo $SUDO_USER

evan> echo $LOGNAME
evan
evan> whoami
evan
evan> who am i | awk '{print $1}'
evan
evan> logname
evan
evan>

Normal sudo:

evan> sudo -s
root> echo $USER
root
root> echo $SUDO_USER
evan
root> echo $LOGNAME
root
root> whoami
root
root> who am i | awk '{print $1}'
evan
root> logname
evan
root>

sudo su - :

evan> sudo su -
[root ]# echo $USER
root
[root ]# echo $SUDO_USER

[root ]# echo $LOGNAME
root
[root ]# whoami
root
[root ]# who am i | awk '{print $1}'
evan
[root ]# logname
evan
[root ]#

sudo su -; su tom :

evan> sudo su -
[root ]# su tom
tom$ echo $USER
tom
tom$ echo $SUDO_USER

tom$ echo $LOGNAME
tom
tom$ whoami
tom
tom$ who am i | awk '{print $1}'
evan
tom$ logname
evan
tom$
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In that case you can just use who | awk '{print $1}' –  SiegeX Jan 4 '11 at 20:42
2  
... if you're the only one logged in (and it's only once). –  Dennis Williamson Jan 4 '11 at 21:02
2  
all you need is 2 arguments: who am i is the same as who smells bad. Also, it only works if STDIN is associated with a TTY. So if you run echo "hello" | who am i it simply won't work. –  tylerl Jul 4 '11 at 0:16
    
This is for use inside of a script. Why would I run echo "hello" | who am i from inside a script?? –  evan Jul 4 '11 at 0:54
2  
@even True, though I'd like it to require as little configuration as possible, so I'm using logname now, which as it turns out does work, where who am i does not. –  Bart van Heukelom Dec 7 '11 at 19:10

There's no perfect answer. When you change user IDs, the original user ID is not usually preserved, so the information is lost. Some programs, such as logname and who -m implement a hack where they check to see which terminal is connected to stdin, and then check to see what user is logged in on that terminal.

This solution often works, but isn't foolproof, and certainly shouldn't be considered secure. For example, imagine if who outputs the following:

tom     pts/0        2011-07-03 19:18 (1.2.3.4)
joe     pts/1        2011-07-03 19:10 (5.6.7.8)

tom used su to get to root, and runs your program. If STDIN is not redirected, then a program like logname will output tom. If it IS redirected (e.g. from a file) as so:

logname < /some/file

Then the result is "no login name", since the input isn't the terminal. More interestingly still, though, is the fact that the user could pose as a different logged in user. Since Joe is logged in on pts/1, Tom could pretend to be him by running

logname < /dev/pts1

Now, it says joe even though tom is the one who ran the command. In other words, if you use this mechanism in any sort of security role, you're crazy.

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If you're running the script yourself (as evidenced by the commands used), security isn't the issue. If it is, you have a lot more of an issue since they also have sudo access. The person could just copy the script and modify it any way they like. This is simply a way to get the logged in name for use in a script. Or am I missing something about what you're saying? –  evan Jul 4 '11 at 0:36
    
@evan: Having sudo access does not imply the ability to overwrite files. –  Flimzy May 16 '13 at 18:29
    
@Flimzy In what case does root not have the ability to overwrite a files? –  evan May 18 '13 at 17:37
    
@evan: Any time your sudo access doesn't give you access to a shell, or any other command that can overwrite files, obviously. –  Flimzy May 18 '13 at 22:37

This is a ksh function I wrote on HP-UX. I don't know how it will work with Bash in Linux. The idea is that the sudo process is running as the original user and the child processes are the target user. By cycling back through parent processes, we can find the user of the original process.

#
# The options of ps require UNIX_STD=2003.  I am setting it
# in a subshell to avoid having it pollute the parent's namespace.
#
function findUser
{
    thisPID=$$
    origUser=$(whoami)
    thisUser=$origUser
    while [ "$thisUser" = "$origUser" ]
    do
        ( export UNIX_STD=2003; ps -p$thisPID -ouser,ppid,pid,comm ) | grep $thisPID | read thisUser myPPid myPid myComm
        thisPID=$myPPid
    done
    if [ "$thisUser" = "root" ]
    then
        thisUser=$origUser
    fi
    if [ "$#" -gt "0" ]
    then
        echo $origUser--$thisUser--$myComm
    else
        echo $thisUser
    fi
    return 0
}

I know the original question was from a long time ago but people (such as me) are still asking and this looked like a good place to put the solution.

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How about using logname(1) to get the user's login name?

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logname(1) doesn't work but logname does - adding the results above –  evan Jan 5 '11 at 19:03
    
originally I had tried $LOGNAME but that didn't work. Also added to the results above. –  evan Jan 5 '11 at 19:11
    
Also only works if STDIN is a tty –  tylerl Jul 4 '11 at 0:17

user1683793's findUser() function ported to bash and extended so it returns usernames stored in NSS libraries as well.

#!/bin/bash

function findUser() {
    thisPID=$$
    origUser=$(whoami)
    thisUser=$origUser

    while [ "$thisUser" = "$origUser" ]
    do
        ARR=($(ps h -p$thisPID -ouser,ppid;))
        thisUser="${ARR[0]}"
        myPPid="${ARR[1]}"
        thisPID=$myPPid
    done

    getent passwd "$thisUser" | cut -d: -f1
}

user=$(findUser)
echo "logged in: $user"
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FYI: this function (and the one it was based on) won't cycle back through multiple shells spawned by sudo nested in each other. –  asdfghjkl Dec 11 '13 at 16:31

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