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I'm sorry for the vague title, I think you really have to see the snippet to know what I mean:

float[] foo = new float[3];
FillFoos(foo);
return foo;

I'd like to have that in one line (I use this snippet very often). How would that be possible?

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Note: Of course, I can't edit FillFoos to simply return a float[]. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 20:18
    
Why you can't? just return updated input values. –  Saeed Amiri Jan 4 '11 at 20:20
    
And your reason for a one liner is ? –  JonH Jan 4 '11 at 20:21
    
It's a wrapper over C++ DLL code. I have access to FillFoos only, I can't edit it. My reason for a one liner is that I have this code structure over 100 times in my code. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 20:24
1  
if you haven't already, check out this stack-exchange proposal. I think you'll find it useful. –  greatwolf Jan 14 '11 at 7:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In C#, you could make a generic function that allocates an array and uses a supplied delegate to fill it:

 public static T[] AllocAndFill<T>(Action<T[]> fillAction, int count)
 {
      T[] array = new T[count];
      fillAction(array);
      return array;
 }

And use it like this do:

 var result =  AllocAndFill<float>(FillFoos,3);
share|improve this answer
    
That's the most logical solution, unfortunately it won't work in my context, as Action has many more possible signatures. Accepted nonetheless. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 20:34
    
Well, you can make function overloads that allow you to call fill functions with extra parameters, or use lambda syntax to write an action inline. I can elaborate if you're interested... –  user180326 Jan 4 '11 at 20:39
    
No need to elaborate, I understand. Thanks. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 20:44

If you can't alter the FillFoos function, then your snippet is as short as it can be.

You could, of course, do this:

float[] foo = new float[3]; FillFoos(foo); return foo;

But that's still three statements and is fairly tough to read.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the laugh. :) –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 20:22
    
+1, very interesting:) –  Saeed Amiri Jan 4 '11 at 20:22

You could just create a function:

public float[] GetFoos()
{
    float[] foo = new float[3];
    FillFoos(foo);
    return foo;
}

EDIT: If you need to change the size of the array and the method to populate the array then you could do this:

public float[] GetFoos(int count, Action<float[]> populateAction)
{
    float[] items = (float[])Array.CreateInstance(typeof(float), count);
    populateAction(items);
    return items;
}

then you can call it like this:

float[] items = GetFoos(3, FillFoos);

You can even make it generic:

public T[] GetFoos<T>(int count, Action<T[]> populateAction)
{
    T[] items = (T[])Array.CreateInstance(typeof(T), count);
    populateAction(items);
    return items;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd make it static. –  Kevin Jan 4 '11 at 20:21
    
It's not always foo, not always 3 floats, and not always FillFoos. It's different functions that fill float arrays. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 20:23
    
You can make the method Generic, and accept the array length as an argument. –  Kyle Trauberman Jan 4 '11 at 20:25
    
And add a delegate for FillFoos' replacement? This can't work, FillFoos is not always 1 parameter long, sadly. :/ –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 20:26

If you just want to save some typing, you could define a macro with your code block in it.

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Wrap it in another method.

T[] GetObjects<T>(int length) 
{
    T[] foo = new T[length]; 
    FillFoos(foo); 
    return foo; 
}

Now, instead of using that snippet everywhere, just call GetObjects<Foo>(3).

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If you can't change FillFoos, then you could write some kind of helper method (perhaps as an extension method on whatever object contains FillFoos).

public static class Extensions
{
    public static float[] SuperFoo(this FooObject foo, float[] floats)
    {
        foo.FillFoos(floats);
        return floats;
    }
}

Then:

return fooObj.SuperFoo(new float[3]);
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