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There have been a couple of hints that seem to have gotten me close here, but with some unique issues, I'm hoping this question is distinguishing enough to merit its own posting.

For starters here's what I have. I have an Oracle procedure that returns a standard REF CURSOR, and this REF CURSOR is passed back to my application. The REF CURSOR is a list of lookup IDs.

I then want to take this list and bring it to another data store and use it in a select statement. It will absolutely be possible to accomplish this by looping through the REF CURSOR, but I'm hoping to avoid that. I would much rather be able to write a SELECT...WHERE lookup_id IN result_ref_cursor OR SELECT...WHERE EXISTS...

First is this possible or should I just try a less than elegant solution? If it is possible, any hints as to where I should get started looking?

I'm relatively new to Oracle, but fairly experienced in RDBMs in general, so feel free to just through some links at me and I can study up. Much appreciated

share|improve this question
    
Create an object type that is a table of your ID type, then you can use the TABLE() function in the FROM clause of a subquery – kurosch Jan 4 '11 at 20:55
    
When you say "another data store" do you mean a separate physical database? – APC Jan 5 '11 at 7:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why kurosch didn't put his response as an "answer" I'll have no idea.

So, what you do is define a SQL type which describes one row of the output of the ref cursor, and also a SQL type which is a table of the previous. Then, you'll create a pipelined function which returns the rows returned by the ref cursor. This function can then be used in a standard SQL. I'm borrowing from Ask Tom on this one.

create or replace type myLookupId as object ( id int)
/

create or replace type myLookupIdTable as table of myLookupId
/

create or replace function f return myLookupIdTable PIPELINED is
  l_data myLookupId;
  l_id number;
  p_cursor SYS_REFCURSOR;
begin
  p_cursor := function_returning_ref_cursor();
  loop
    fetch p_cursor into l_id;
    exit when p_cursor%notfound;
    l_data := myLookupId( l_id );
    pipe row (l_data);
  end loop;
 return;
end;
/

And now a sample query...

SELECT  * 
FROM    SOME_TABLE
WHERE   lookup_id in (SELECT ID FROM table(f));

Sorry if the code isn't exactly right, I don't have the DB to test right now.

share|improve this answer
    
I saw this on Ask Tom, and played around with it some. I couldn't get it to work, but I'm very confident it was my own failure for that. One question I did have is can I put those type definitions in my package? I saw somewhere else that the types would have to be defined at a DB level. – Andrew Jan 5 '11 at 13:12
    
That's right, you would have to make SQL types, not types in a package. – Adam Hawkes Jan 5 '11 at 14:01

There are several directions you could go with this, but I did a search on the specific solution you want and it seems like no-one has done it often enough to show up there. What you can do is search the oracle metalink - that is usually really good at finding obscure answers. (Though you do need a service agreement - just found out that mine expired :( )

Other possible solutions:

Create a link between the data stores so that you can do the select in the plsql directly

Create a function in Java that loops through it for you to create the string for the query. This will look a little more pretty at least.

Otherwise, REF CURSOR's need to go back and forth - I don't know how you can pipe the results of the REF CURSOR in one connection to the query in another without looping through it.

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