Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to be able to use Cmockery to mock C functions called from C++ code I'm testing. As a step towards that, I've renamed the Cmockery example run_tests.c to run_tests.cpp, and am attempting to compile and link it with cmockery.c:

g++ -m32 -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -DPIC -I ../cmockery-0.1.2 -I /usr/include/malloc -c run_tests.cpp -o obj/run_tests.o
gcc -m32 -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -DPIC -Wno-format -I ../cmockery-0.1.2 -I /usr/include/malloc -c ../cmockery-0.1.2/cmockery.c -o obj/cmockery.o
g++  -m32 -o run_tests obj/run_tests.o obj/cmockery.o

The first two command lines (to compile) are successful, but after the last I get:

Undefined symbols:
  "_run_tests(UnitTest const*, unsigned long)", referenced from:
      _main in run_tests.o
ld: symbol(s) not found
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

That undefined symbol is from line 29 of run_tests.cpp:

return run_tests(tests);

The run_tests() function is defined in cmockery.c.

After reading "Linking C++ code with 'gcc' (without g++)", I tried:

gcc -lstdc++ -m32 -o run_tests obj/run_tests.o obj/cmockery.o

But got the same result:

Undefined symbols:
  "_run_tests(UnitTest const*, unsigned long)", referenced from:
      _main in run_tests.o
ld: symbol(s) not found
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

How do I compile and link C++ code so it finds the symbols in C code?

share|improve this question
    
None of the answers (at the time of writing this comment) make it clear that I don't need to modify cmockery.h. I can put the extern "C" declaration around the #include <cmockery.h> in run_tests.cpp. I'll accept the first answer to make this clear. –  Daryl Spitzer Jan 4 '11 at 21:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think that you can get thinkgs to link from C++ by adding the following around the contents of the cmockery.h file:

At or near the beginning:

#if defined(__cplusplus)
extern "C" {
#endif

At or near the end:

#if defined(__cplusplus)
}
#endif

That way, use of the header in C sources will ignore the extern "C" part of the declaration, but when the header is include in C++ builds, the compiler will be properly told that the linkage for the declarations in that header use C semantics.

For a quick-n-dirty test or if you'd rather not modify the header, you can try:

extern "C" {
#include "cmockery.h"
}

but my preference would be to put the extern "C" block in the header (and only around the stuff that's required - that might need a bit of analysis).

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you consider putting the extern "C" around the #include "quick-n-dirty"? –  Daryl Spitzer Jan 4 '11 at 22:13
    
In the general case because it might apply the extern "C" modifier to stuff that doesn't expect it (in particular if the header includes other headers that are C++ aware). Headers could handle this by using the extern "C++" declaration spec, but I've only seen that used once to handle this case (probably because it's little known, and it's not needed nearly as much as the extern "C" version). –  Michael Burr Jan 6 '11 at 1:34

In your header files included by your C++ code, you need extern "C" declarations for all the functions that are compiled in C.

share|improve this answer

when you include the C header files from C++, have you wrapped the prototypes with extern "C" { .... }? If you don't the C++ function name wil be 'mangled' at link time.

share|improve this answer

As Karl said, extern "C" { .. } is needed.

The reason: C++ mangles the names (adds funny characters) so that linking is type safe. C doesn't, so in that language linking foo(int) to foo(double) is possible (but wrong and embarrassing).

For successful interoperability, you need to tell the C++ compiler that some function names are not to be mangled, in order for linking to succeed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.