Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just have to do a simple comparison i.e.

byte[] keya = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("myFamilyColumn:1");
byte[] keyb = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("myFamilyColumn:1");
Console.WriteLine(keya == keyb);

but the result is false, and their hash code is also different, am i missing something here?

Thanks in advance !

share|improve this question
2  
If you can use LINQ, you can do keya.SequenceEqual(keyb). –  Ani Jan 4 '11 at 21:06
    
Unfortunately that's Not available in mono. –  Ali Jan 4 '11 at 21:34
1  
Isn't this a duplicate of Compare Two .Net Array Objects (byte arrays)? –  MarkJ Jan 5 '11 at 9:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I don't believe there's anything in the framework which will give array equality in the way you'd want. However, it's not too hard to write your own implementation of IEqualityComparer<T> for arrays. For example (compiled but untested):

public static class ArrayEqualityComparer
{
    public static IEqualityComparer<T[]> Create<T>(
        IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        return new ArrayEqualityComparer<T>(comparer);
    }
}

public sealed class ArrayEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T[]>
{
    private static readonly IEqualityComparer<T[]> defaultInstance = new
        ArrayEqualityComparer<T>();

    public static IEqualityComparer<T[]> Default
    {
        get { return defaultInstance; }
    }

    private readonly IEqualityComparer<T> elementComparer;

    public ArrayEqualityComparer() : this(EqualityComparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    public ArrayEqualityComparer(IEqualityComparer<T> elementComparer)
    {
        this.elementComparer = elementComparer;        
    }

    public bool Equals(T[] x, T[] y)
    {
        if (x == y)
        {
            return true;
        }
        if (x == null || y == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (x.Length != y.Length)
        {
            return false;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < x.Length; i++)
        {
            if (!elementComparer.Equals(x[i], y[i]))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T[] array)
    {
        if (array == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        int hash = 23;
        foreach (T item in array)
        {
            hash = hash * 31 + elementComparer.GetHashCode(item);
        }
        return hash;
    }
}

(Note that this currently assumes that elementComparer will cope with null values for both GetHashCode and Equals. The interface doesn't guarantee that, but the default equality comparers actually do handle it. You could modify the above code to be more robust, of course... I just don't have time right now.)

Usage:

IEqualityComparer<byte[]> x = ArrayEqualityComparer<byte>.Default;
bool equal = x.Equals(bytes1, bytes2);

IEqualityComparer<string[]> y = 
    ArrayEqualityComparer.Create(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
bool whatever = x.Equals(new[][] { "X", "Y" }, new[] { "x", "y" });
share|improve this answer
    
@Jon I'm really surprised you're not commenting on the use of System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes –  Conrad Frix Jan 4 '11 at 21:13
1  
@Conrad: I'm assuming that that was just the simplest way the OP could think of to create two "equal" byte arrays. –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '11 at 21:14
    
@Jon ok that's fair –  Conrad Frix Jan 4 '11 at 21:16
    
I prefer your answer from Jan 2009 to this duplicate question. The code's so much briefer in the other answer. –  MarkJ Jan 5 '11 at 9:52
1  
@MarkJ: They both have their places. For example, if you want to create a HashSet of arrays, you really want an IEqualityComparer<T[]>. If you just want to compare for equality in code that you own, the 2009 answer is possibly more appropriate. –  Jon Skeet Jan 5 '11 at 9:59

keya and keyb are two entirely separate objects that just happen to contain the same bytes.

If you want to compare to see if two strings have the same characters, perhaps you should look at methods like String.Equals?

share|improve this answer
2  
Yes, or iterate through the arrays and compare each pair of bytes. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Jan 4 '11 at 21:04
    
Actually i don't want to iterate the collection of keys which are of byte[] datatype because i already know the key and when i get the bytes from string then it didn't return me object correspond to that key but when i use the reference of the key from the iteration i found the object, why is that so? –  Ali Jan 4 '11 at 21:20
    
@Ali: It sounds like you're using these byte arrays as keys into a collection? Firstly, if these are representations of strings then it would be better to use the strings themselves as keys, otherwise, you can write your own equality comparer and tell the collection to use that instead of the default. –  Anon. Jan 4 '11 at 21:27
    
I guess I've to write my own equality comparer. –  Ali Jan 4 '11 at 21:44

This generic extension should do the trick:

public static class ArrayExtensions
{
    public static bool ElementsEqual<T>(this T[] left, T[] right)
        where T : IEquatable<T>
    {
        if (left == null || right == null)
        {
            return !(left == null ^ right == null);
        }
        else if (left.Length != right.Length)
        {
            return false;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < left.Length; i++)
        {
            if (!left[i].Equals(right[i]))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Arrays are reference types so testing for equality checks to see if the pointers are the same. They're not.

If you want to compare the elements and not the arrays themselves, you can import System.Linq and use keya.SequenceEqual(keyb).

share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately that's not available in mono which is my development environment. –  Ali Jan 4 '11 at 21:33
    
@Ali: Oh, then you have to compare each element like the other answers here. –  Trystan Spangler Jan 4 '11 at 21:44
    
@Ali: I believe Mono has supported LINQ to Objects for quite some time. –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '11 at 23:04
    
@Jon: But i didn't find System.Linq namespace when i edit the references? –  Ali Jan 6 '11 at 8:07
1  
@Ali: Do you have a reference to the System.Core assembly? Which version of Mono are you using? –  Jon Skeet Jan 6 '11 at 8:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.