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EDIT: There is another wrinkle in here that I missed that turns out to make a big difference. The method signature of doAnotherThing is instead the following:

<T extends Bar> T doAnotherThing(List<Foo<T>> foo) {
    return foo.get(0).doSomething();
}

Disregard the fact that it is a List, just pay attention to the fact that List is a generic class/interface. I'm calling the method like so:

doAnotherThing(new ArrayList<FooImpl>);

So, I have a class and interface defined like so:

abstract class Bar {
    // some neat stuff
}

class BarImpl extends Bar {
    // some cool stuff
}

interface Foo<T extends Bar> {
    T doSomething();
}

class FooImpl implements Foo<BarImpl> {
    BarImpl doSomething() {
        // Does something awesome
    }
}

This is all fine and dandy and works great.

Now, I have a method like so:

<T extends Bar> T doAnotherThing(List<Foo<T>> foo) {
    return foo.get(0).doSomething();
}

This method is a generic method in a completely different class and is not part of the chain above.

However, when I try to use this method in the following manner, I'm getting an error saying that the types don't match:

doAnotherThing(new FooImpl());

FooImpl implements Foo<T>, so I don't see how this is an error? Maybe I'm misunderstanding something? Thanks

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2  
In your example, BarImpl does not extend Bar. –  AniDev Jan 4 '11 at 21:39
2  
it works for me. Apart from the fact that you forgot BarImpl extends Bar –  Bozho Jan 4 '11 at 21:40
    
could you share the compiler error message? –  Grzegorz Oledzki Jan 4 '11 at 21:40
    
The method doAnotherThing(Foo<T>) in the type *** is not applicable for the arguments (FooImpl) –  Polaris878 Jan 4 '11 at 21:46
    
Perhaps a better explanation of the file structure and location of the method doAnotherThing would help, because I was able to replicate without any trouble. Bar.java: abstract class Bar{ public Bar(){ doAnotherThing(new FooImpl()); } <T extends Bar> T doAnotherThing(Foo<T> foo){ return foo.doSomething(); } static class BarImpl extends Bar{} interface Foo<T extends Bar>{ T doSomething(); } static class FooImpl implements Foo<BarImpl>{ public BarImpl doSomething(){ return null; } } } –  LINEMAN78 Jan 4 '11 at 22:22
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Answer changed to reflect clarification in question

The complilation error (type mismatch) is actually perfectly correct. Note that the method definition says the parameter is a List<Foo<T>>. This means that the list can contain any Foo<T>, and the method must even be able to add any object that implements Foo<T>. And that's not the case when you give it a List<FooImpl>, because that is only allowed to contain instances of FooImpl. This works:

doAnotherThing(new ArrayList<Foo<BarImpl>>());

Mixing generics and polymorphism quickly leads to very complex scenarios, so it should be done sparingly.

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Michael, this should be fixed. Please see question again. Thanks. –  Polaris878 Jan 4 '11 at 22:41
    
@Polaris878: changed answer, I think I have it now. –  Michael Borgwardt Jan 4 '11 at 23:17
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Works for me. I suspect whatever's causing the error, it isn't in the version you've got up above. Does the code below (all one file, FooBarBaz.java) compile for you? The only change I had to make to your code was to make FooImpl.doSomething() public. (Oh, and make it return something. :))

public class FooBarBaz {

    <T extends Bar> T doAnotherThing(Foo<T> foo) {
        return foo.doSomething();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new FooBarBaz().doAnotherThing(new FooImpl());
    }
}

abstract class Bar {
    // some neat stuff
}

class BarImpl extends Bar {
    // some cool stuff
}

interface Foo<T extends Bar> {
    T doSomething();
}

class FooImpl implements Foo<BarImpl> {
    public BarImpl doSomething() {
        return null;
    }
}

Works fine for me with IDEA 9, JDK 1.6 on Mac OS 10.6.5.

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You are correct, this does indeed work. However I missed a (major) detail which I highlighted above. –  Polaris878 Jan 4 '11 at 22:40
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Let's assume BarImpl extends Bar, which I believe you meant from the beginning.

How does the augmented Foo interface look like?

Is it:

interface Foo<T extends Bar> {
    T doSomething();
    T doAnotherThing(Foo<T> foo);
}

?

In such a case everything works with the following impl:

 class FooImpl implements Foo<BarImpl> {

 public BarImpl doSomething() {
  return null;
 }

 public BarImpl doAnotherThing(Foo<BarImpl> foo) {
  return null;
 }

}

Now, there might be a problem if you defined it otherwise:

interface Foo<T extends Bar> {
    T doSomething();
    <T extends Bar> T doAnotherThing(Foo<T> foo);
}

Because such a way of defining doAnotherThing introduces another generics parameter. What's confusing the interface's parameter and one from method share the name, i.e. T. (BTW, I was surprised to learn Java allows such confusing name clash)

The last definition could be replaced with:

interface Foo<T extends Bar> {
    T doSomething();
    <Y extends Bar> Y doAnotherThing(Foo<Y> foo);
}

which makes it more clear why public BarImpl doAnotherThing(Foo<BarImpl> foo) is not a proper way of overriding of this method.

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doAnotherThing is not part of Foo<T>, it is part of another class –  Polaris878 Jan 4 '11 at 21:49
    
I see. My answer was a blind guess. –  Grzegorz Oledzki Jan 4 '11 at 23:33
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I believe my original answer is incorrect. The following seems to work fine though. Just make the doSomething method public and it compiles fine under Java6.

abstract class Bar {
    // some neat stuff
}

class BarImpl extends Bar {
    // some cool stuff
}

interface Foo<T extends Bar> {
    public T doSomething();
}

class FooImpl implements Foo<BarImpl> {
    public BarImpl doSomething() {
        return null;
    }
}


public class Test {
<T extends Bar> T doAnotherThing(Foo<T> foo) {
    return foo.doSomething();
}

}
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