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I've got some non-copyable classes. I don't invoke any of the copy operators or constructor, and this code compiles fine. But then I upgraded to Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate instead of Professional. Now the compiler is calling the copy constructor- even when the move constructor should be invoked. For example, in the following snippet:

inline D3D9Mesh CreateSphere(D3D9Render& render, float radius, float slices) {
    D3D9Mesh retval(render);
    /* ... */
    return std::move(retval);
}

Error: Cannot create copy constructor, because the class is non-copyable. However, I quite explicitly moved it.

Edit:

class D3D9Mesh 
: public Monitor<D3D9Mesh> 
{
public:
    std::unique_ptr<ID3DXMesh, COMDeleter> Mesh;
    std::unique_ptr<ID3DXBuffer, COMDeleter> Adjacency;

    inline D3D9Mesh(D3D9Render& ref)
    : Monitor<D3D9Mesh>(&ref) 
    {
    }
};

where Monitor is a simple class that is copyable/etc. It's the unique_ptrs which are clearly not kosher for the compiler.

Monitor's code:

class D3DCommon {};
template<typename T> class Monitor : public D3DCommon {
protected:
    D3D9Render* render;
    Monitor(D3D9Render* ptr) 
    : render(ptr) {
        render->AddPointer(static_cast<T*>(this));
    }
    Monitor(Monitor&& ref) {
        render->AddPointer(static_cast<T*>(this));
    }
    Monitor(const Monitor& ref) {           
        render->AddPointer(static_cast<T*>(this));
    }
    ~Monitor() {
        render->RemovePointer(static_cast<T*>(this));
    }
public:
    D3D9Render& GetRender() {
        return *render;
    }
};
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Are you sure it's std::move that broke, and not something else? Like... Direct3D classes becoming non-movable? –  kotlinski Jan 4 '11 at 22:11
    
@kotlinksi: D3D is based on COM interfaces. D3D9Mesh must be my own wrapper classes. –  Puppy Jan 4 '11 at 22:16
    
Can you post the full definition of D3D9Mesh and Monitor? –  GManNickG Jan 5 '11 at 1:25
    
What line gives you the error, the first line of the function or the last? Apropos AFAIK you don't need to move a return value, it's one of the special cases in which it's implied that the expression is an rvalue. –  Motti Jan 5 '11 at 6:29
    
@Motti: It's the attempt to return- the compiler is trying to invoke the copy constructor on it. That's why I explicitly moved it- because the return value is non-copyable. –  Puppy Jan 5 '11 at 11:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's weird. How is your D3D9Mesh class implemented ?
The following code compiles fine for me with vs2010 ultimate :

#include <iostream>
struct S
{
   S(){std::cout << "ctor\n";}
   S(S&&){std::cout << "move ctor\n";}
   S& operator=(S&&){std::cout << "move op=\n";return *this;}

private:
   S(const S&);
   S& operator=(const S&);


};

inline S CreateSphere() 
{
    S s;
    return s;
}


int main()
{
   S s = CreateSphere(); // NRVO
   s = CreateSphere(); // move
}

PS : Don't write return std::move(something) if "something" is a local variable created in the function. The compiler already know that the returning a local variable from a function is a temporary(an rvalue). ReCasting yourself with std::move will not make it move better, however it will prevent on vs2010 some optimization such as NRVO.

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It will, however, prevent the compiler from trying to copy it. RVO/NRVO cannot be depended on and the Standard will still require that the type T is copyable. The reason that your code compiles fine is because you don't prevent the compiler from using the copy constructor or copy assignment operator, so you can't know that it compiles cleanly for any type S which doesn't have them. –  Puppy Jan 5 '11 at 0:35
    
That compiles cleanly for me too. I actually can't make it error out- even in the same project. –  Puppy Jan 5 '11 at 11:12

MSVC doesn't do implicit move constructors. You need to make it yourself:

class D3D9Mesh 
: public Monitor<D3D9Mesh> 
{
public:   
    inline D3D9Mesh(D3D9Render& ref)
    : Monitor(&ref) // don't need to re-state template argument, by the way
    {
    }

    D3D9Mesh(D3D9Mesh&& other)
    : Monitor(std::move(other))
    {}
};

Now it's movable.

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