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Should the ordering of parameter types matter when calling a stored procedure in oracle?

For example (please forgive syntax errors)

my_proc (
param_a IN NUMBER
, param_b IN STRING
, param_c OUT NUMBER
, param_d OUT STRING
) begin
param_c = param_a
param_d = param_b
end

When we do something like the above we get the values passed in back out in the OUT parameters (again please forgive the specific syntax).

However, when we move param_c over param_b we get 0.0 and NULL instead of the values passed in.

my_proc (
param_a IN NUMBER
, param_c OUT NUMBER
, param_b IN STRING
, param_d OUT STRING
) begin
param_c = param_a
param_d = param_b
end

We are testing this in PL/SQL.

Is there something we're overlooking?

Thanks BayouBob

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2 Answers

You can define your IN/OUT parameters in whatever order you want. How are you calling this procedure? If you pass in an empty string you will get a NULL output value. For example:

declare
   param_c   NUMBER;
   param_d   VARCHAR2(100);
begin

  my_proc (
    0,
    param_c,
    '',
    param_d
  );

  dbms_output.put_line(param_c);

  dbms_output.put_line(nvl(param_d, 'null'));

end;

This should output:

0
null
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to everyone who considered this, but it turns out to be something kinda simple. It appears the way you call a stored procedure through ojdbc6 makes a big difference.

I should confess this was originally a java / oracle question we were trying to confirm with PL/SQL.

If we called the stored procedure as 'call my_proc(...)' the ordering of IN and OUT parameters appears to be important; whereas, 'begin my_proc(...) end' works just fine.

Note: this applies to building a callablestatement in Java 6 with ojdbc6.

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Are you using named or positional parameters? Named sometimes aren't handled as you might expect and are treated as positional, which might explain what you saw. –  Alex Poole Jan 5 '11 at 14:59
    
We are switching from positional to named in an attempt to decouple ourselves from the whims of the client who provides the database we must connect to. –  Bayou Bob Jan 13 '11 at 20:57
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