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I've noticed that classes that subclass android classes don't require having a constructor and calling the constructor of the superclass. Why is that? I thought all classes except pojo's needed a constructor?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you're not overriding the constructor. There's no requirement* saying you need to override the constructor of the superclass.

I thought all classes except pojo's needed a constructor?

They have a constructor. It's inherited from their parent class. You're just not REIMPLEMENTING the constructor.

*As noted by @Christian, you would need to implement a constructor if the parent class's constructor took arguments. In the case of android classes (most), they don't.

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Ah. I guess that was a fundamental of java that I misunderstood. I thought even if you aren't reimplementing the constructor you still had to call it somehow. –  Matt Phillips Jan 4 '11 at 22:31
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There's no requirement saying you need to override the constructor of the superclass. if the super-constructor has parameters, then yes: it's mandatory to override it. –  Cristian Jan 4 '11 at 22:34
    
@Christian: Yes you're right. –  Falmarri Jan 4 '11 at 22:43
    
Also, you need to call the constructor of your superclass if it sets private final fields. –  espinchi Jan 4 '11 at 23:26
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Just being picky, but you can't actually override the constructor of a superclass :) You can only write a constructor for your child class which calls the constructor of a superclass. –  Stewart Murrie Jan 5 '11 at 0:36

Well... those classes you are talking about have a default constructor (one with no parameters). If they had parameters (like the View class), then you MUST override at least one constructor.

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