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I am currently working on a WPF application using Prism with Unity. The model's functionality is split up into several class library projects. For each group of concerns, I have one implementation project and one project consisting only of interfaces and enums. The goal is to be able to modify or completely replace an implementation dll without affecting or having to modify anything else in the application. This being the case, I'm a little stuck on how to register interfaces to their implementation without hard references to both in the top level application.

I know they will have to be referenced together somewhere, but is it against best practices to have that occur in the top level app within the bootstrapper? Should I instead be looking into MEF rather than Unity for this particular problem?

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Can you provide an example model with its functionality split apart? –  Jon Jan 5 '11 at 15:25
    
The application is to serve as a player for scripted UI automation. I have a project I wrote containing the interfaces for UI items we wish to automate and a separate project implementing the automation. The basic set up is as follows: Scripting.ComponentModel - Scripting - UIAutomation.ComponentModel - UIAutomation - Etc. I had considered Prism Modules, but those strike me as more for UI Composition. I had considered a service layer to provide state and abstract away some of the details, but in many cases that would really not be adding much value at a cost of added complexity. –  Mike Jan 9 '11 at 1:27

1 Answer 1

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You typically do this in the module containing the implementations. The Unity container will be provided using dependency injection in the module's constructor; hence, the Shell never needs to actually register the implementations with the interface. The module containing the interfaces is usually an infrastructure DLL (and not a module), and hence can be referenced by the implementation modules.

Note that this is in line with Prism's recommendations regarding seperation of interface / implementation between DLLs. They go into it in some depth with respect to services; although I doubt you'll find any examples of them using it for models or other objects.

Example:

using Microsoft.Practices.Unity;
using YourInfrastructureDll;

public sealed class ModuleImplementationA : IModule
{
   private readonly IUnityContainer _container;

   public ModuleImplementationA(IUnityContainer container)
   {
      _container = container;
   }

   public void Initialize()
   { 
      // IYourInterface is defined in the Infrastructure DLL, while YourImplementationA exists in this module
      _container.RegisterType<IYourInterface, YourImplementationA>();
   }
}

This can be swapped out with another implementation DLL:

using Microsoft.Practices.Unity;
using YourInfrastructureDll;

public sealed class ModuleImplementationB : IModule
{
   private readonly IUnityContainer _container;

   public ModuleImplementationB(IUnityContainer container)
   {
      _container = container;
   }

   public void Initialize()
   { 
      // IYourInterface is defined in the Infrastructure DLL, while YourImplementationB exists in a different module than the first
      _container.RegisterType<IYourInterface, YourImplementationB>();
   }
}
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Perhaps my understanding of the use for modules was off then. Most examples I have seen inject region managers which led me to believe modules were more of a UI Composition thing. Thanks –  Mike Jan 9 '11 at 1:33
    
Modules can be for UI composition, but they can also be for, well, anything. One of the nice things about Prism is that it doesn't impose that on you. Your Data Access Layer may have services defined in infrastructure but implementations in a module (perhaps, one for Oracle, one for SQL Server, etc.) - the same could be applied to a module that simply executes business logic. It depends on the application. –  Matt Jordan Jan 9 '11 at 2:58

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