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I have code that's meant to manage operations on both a networked client and a server, since there is significant overlap between the two. However, there are a few functions here and there that are meant to be exclusively called by the client or server, and accidentally calling a client function on the server (or vice versa) is a significant source of bugs.

To reduce these sorts of programming errors, I'm trying to tag functions so that they'll raise a ruckus if they're misused. My current solution is a simple macro at the start of each function that calls an assert if the client or server accesses members they shouldn't. However, this runs into problems when there are multiple derived instances of classes, in that I have to tag the implementation as client or server side in EVERY child class.

What I'd like to be able to do is put a tag in the virtual member's signature in the base class, so that I only have to tag it once and not run into errors by forgetting to do it repeatedly. I've considered putting a check in a base class implementation and then referring to it with something like base::functionName, but that runs into the same issue as far as needing to manually add the function call to every implementation. Ideally, I'd be able to have parent versions of the function called automatically like default constructors do.

Does anybody know how to achieve something like this in C++? Is there an alternate approach I should be considering?

Thanks!

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4  
Sounds like you should have different code and/or classes for server/client –  Falmarri Jan 5 '11 at 1:04
2  
Why not just factor out the common code into a base class and derive a Server class and Client class from them? –  Puppy Jan 5 '11 at 1:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Another approach might be to override a different method than the one your callers actually call:

class Base {
public:
    void doit(const Something &);
protected:
    virtual void real_doit(const Something &);
};

class Derived: public Base {
protected:
    virtual void real_doit(const Something &);
};

The implementation of Base::doit() could do the check to make sure that it's being called in the right environment, and then call the virtual real_doit() function. Derived classes would override the protected virtual function, and users of either class wouldn't be able to call the protected function.

The Base::doit() function is not virtual so that derived classes can't accidentally override the wrong one. (People can try, but hopefully they'll notice soon enough when it's not called.)

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1  
+1: this is called the non-virtual interface idiom, and allows to enforce pre-conditions and post-conditions only once. –  Matthieu M. Jan 5 '11 at 7:51
    
Thanks. This appears to be the cleanest, least disruptive approach for my purposes. Also, thanks to Matthieu for posting the name of the idiom. While I've seen and used it before, I hadn't realized that it was a standard approach. –  Ian Jan 5 '11 at 19:13

What you've proposed is incredibly complex. It sounds like a simpler solution would be

class CommonStuff {
    // all common code that anybody can safely call
};

class ServerBase : public CommonStuff {
    // only what the server is allowed to call; can safely be overwritten
};

class ClientBase : public CommonStuff {
    // only what the client is allowed to call; can safely be overwritten
};

Compile-time enforcements are much better than any sort of runtime enforcement.

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+1: even though I upvoted Greg's answer because the NVI is a good idiom to know, I don't really understand how one can come into a situation where a class has methods that should never be called... it's a code smell as far as I am concerned. –  Matthieu M. Jan 5 '11 at 7:52

There's not a way within the language (that I know of) to do what you're asking without redesigning your classes. The simplest solution may be to have a Client interface (pure virtual) class that does not declare server functions, and a Server interface class that doesn't declare client functions, and have your consolidated code inherit (publicly) from both interfaces. Then in your client program, use a reference (or pointer) to the Client interface, which does not allow access to any methods not declared in the Client interface. On the server, use the Server interface.

This will also allow you to use derived classes as Server or Client as well.

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I would consider splitting this library into three libraries: A base library that has most everything, a server-only library, and a client-only library. As long as the client doesn't use the server library, you're good. You may end up adding a few extra classes (class Processor might split into BaseProcessor, ClientProcessor, and ServerProcessor, where each subclass has one additional function that the base doesn't.)

If that won't work, could you put the server/client check in the class constructor, and call the assertion there? (That would only work if the server-only or client-only is granular to the class, not to the method.)

If that won't work, would it make any sense to actually compile different versions of your library, based on whether it's a server or client build? Surround the methods, and their declarations, with #ifdef SERVERBUILD and #ifdef CLIENTBUILD, and include some checks to make sure they aren't both defined (#if defined(SERVERBUILD) && defined(CLIENTBUILD), #error Can't define both!).

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I voted up Greg Hewgill's answer, but it got me thinking about ways to add "aspects" such as you request. I used his naming convention here (class Base and method doit):

class Base {
protected:
    class Aspect {
    public:
        Aspect(int x) {
            std::cout << "aspect" << std::endl;
        }
    };
public:
    virtual void doit(const Something &arg, const Aspect hook = 0)
    {
        std::cout << "doit(" << arg << ")" << std::endl;
    }
};

Callers can just say base.doit(arg) since Aspect is a default argument. Its constructor runs before doit and its destructor (not pictured) runs after. Sadly my first idea to make the default argument hook = this is not allowed.

Children can override doit with the same signature and get the same effect.

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I think I see what you're getting at. So you'd have an aspect class "ServerOnly" that would have an assert in its instructor if the client tries to call it? –  Ian Jan 5 '11 at 1:54
    
I really like this approach, and I found it works really elegantly if I define a macro like "#define SERVER_ONLY_RESTRICTION const RestrictServerOnly _hook = 0" that applies the default argument, giving me function definitions that look like "virtual void doit(const Something &arg, SERVER_ONLY_RESTRICTION);" The one thing I should note, though, is that the aspect needs to be protected instead of private or the child classes aren't able to derive from the base function! –  Ian Jan 5 '11 at 2:32
    
I just realized that the Aspect class would only be able to access information with a global scope, when I needed it to be able to access members of the base class. I can't think of a way to give the nested class access, since--as you already stated--"hook = this" is not allowed as a default argument. –  Ian Jan 5 '11 at 2:53

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