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Can anyone point me to some Java snippet wherein i can get business (except Sat and Sun) days between two dates.

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joda-time.sourceforge.net –  marcog Jan 5 '11 at 1:24
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted
public static int getWorkingDaysBetweenTwoDates(Date startDate, Date endDate) {
    Calendar startCal = Calendar.getInstance();
    startCal.setTime(startDate);        

    Calendar endCal = Calendar.getInstance();
    endCal.setTime(endDate);

    int workDays = 0;

    //Return 0 if start and end are the same
    if (startCal.getTimeInMillis() == endCal.getTimeInMillis()) {
        return 0;
    }

    if (startCal.getTimeInMillis() > endCal.getTimeInMillis()) {
        startCal.setTime(endDate);
        endCal.setTime(startDate);
    }

    do {
       //excluding start date
        startCal.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
        if (startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SATURDAY && startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SUNDAY) {
            ++workDays;
        }
    } while (startCal.getTimeInMillis() < endCal.getTimeInMillis()); //excluding end date

    return workDays;
}

Start date and end date are exclusive, Only the days between given dates will be counted. Start date and end date will not be included.

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Got some strange answers if startDate is on or after endDate. If startDate is 1970-01-01 21:27:00 and endDate is 1970-01-01 18:00:00, the function returns 1 instead of 0 days between the same date. Also if startDate is 2011-01-05 21:27:00 and endDate is 2011-01-04 00:00:00 the function returns 2 instead of -1 or 1 (if absolute values are expected). –  Joseph Gordon Jan 5 '11 at 22:43
    
The above code snippet is meant for calculating working days between two dates without time. –  Piyush Jan 6 '11 at 4:26
4  
It works, but execution time depends on the number of days :-/ –  ymajoros Feb 15 '12 at 8:17
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Solution without loop:

static long days(Date start, Date end){
    //Ignore argument check

    Calendar c1 = Calendar.getInstance();
    c1.setTime(start);
    int w1 = c1.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c1.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w1);

    Calendar c2 = Calendar.getInstance();
    c2.setTime(end);
    int w2 = c2.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c2.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w2);

    //end Saturday to start Saturday 
    long days = (c2.getTimeInMillis()-c1.getTimeInMillis())/(1000*60*60*24);
    long daysWithoutSunday = days-(days*2/7);

    return daysWithoutSunday-w1+w2;
}
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Really impressed with your solution. I was trying to accomplish the same thing but wound up with switches to catch the beginning and end dates on the weekend instead of doing the date shifting. This is much more elegant. –  Joseph Gordon Jan 5 '11 at 5:31
    
@Shengyuan : I know it's a bit late now, but could you please explain the last 2 lines: long days = (c2.getTimeInMillis()-c1.getTimeInMillis())/(1000*60*60*24); long daysWithoutSunday = days-(days*2/7); –  Vrushank May 27 '12 at 6:05
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I used Shengyuan Lu's solution, but I needed to make a fix for the case where the method is called when one of the dates is on a Saturday and the other a Sunday - otherwise the answer is off by a day:

static long days(Date start, Date end){
    //Ignore argument check

    Calendar c1 = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
    c1.setTime(start);
    int w1 = c1.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c1.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w1 + 1);

    Calendar c2 = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
    c2.setTime(end);
    int w2 = c2.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c2.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w2 + 1);

    //end Saturday to start Saturday 
    long days = (c2.getTimeInMillis()-c1.getTimeInMillis())/(1000*60*60*24);
    long daysWithoutSunday = days-(days*2/7);

    if (w1 == Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        w1 = Calendar.MONDAY;
    }
    if (w2 == Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        w2 = Calendar.MONDAY;
    }
    return daysWithoutSunday-w1+w2;
}
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why don't you just edit Shengyuan Lu's solution? –  ymajoros Feb 15 '12 at 8:19
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I don't have a Java based solution, but have a PHP one, hope it helps:

function getDate($days) {   
    for ($i = 0; $i < $days; $i ++) {                                      
        if (date('N' , strtotime('+' . ($i + 1) . ' days')) > 5) {  
            $days++;                                                        
        }                                                                   
    }                                                                       

    return date('l, F jS', strtotime('+' . $days . ' days', time()));
}
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Sure, it does help. –  John C Jan 5 '11 at 1:21
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The do while in the solution of Piyush is wrong, it should be :

do {
    if (startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SATURDAY && startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        ++workDays;
    }
    startCal.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
} while (startCal.getTimeInMillis() < endCal.getTimeInMillis());
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The startCal.add should add onto the Calendar.DATE field, not the Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, I was getting weird results with over Decemeber / January period.

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