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Can anyone point me to some Java snippet wherein i can get business (except Sat and Sun) days between two dates.

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1  
joda-time.sourceforge.net –  marcog Jan 5 '11 at 1:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted
public static int getWorkingDaysBetweenTwoDates(Date startDate, Date endDate) {
    Calendar startCal = Calendar.getInstance();
    startCal.setTime(startDate);        

    Calendar endCal = Calendar.getInstance();
    endCal.setTime(endDate);

    int workDays = 0;

    //Return 0 if start and end are the same
    if (startCal.getTimeInMillis() == endCal.getTimeInMillis()) {
        return 0;
    }

    if (startCal.getTimeInMillis() > endCal.getTimeInMillis()) {
        startCal.setTime(endDate);
        endCal.setTime(startDate);
    }

    do {
       //excluding start date
        startCal.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
        if (startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SATURDAY && startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SUNDAY) {
            ++workDays;
        }
    } while (startCal.getTimeInMillis() < endCal.getTimeInMillis()); //excluding end date

    return workDays;
}

Start date and end date are exclusive, Only the days between given dates will be counted. Start date and end date will not be included.

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Got some strange answers if startDate is on or after endDate. If startDate is 1970-01-01 21:27:00 and endDate is 1970-01-01 18:00:00, the function returns 1 instead of 0 days between the same date. Also if startDate is 2011-01-05 21:27:00 and endDate is 2011-01-04 00:00:00 the function returns 2 instead of -1 or 1 (if absolute values are expected). –  Joseph Gordon Jan 5 '11 at 22:43
    
The above code snippet is meant for calculating working days between two dates without time. –  Piyush Mattoo Jan 6 '11 at 4:26
5  
It works, but execution time depends on the number of days :-/ –  ymajoros Feb 15 '12 at 8:17

Solution without loop:

static long days(Date start, Date end){
    //Ignore argument check

    Calendar c1 = Calendar.getInstance();
    c1.setTime(start);
    int w1 = c1.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c1.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w1);

    Calendar c2 = Calendar.getInstance();
    c2.setTime(end);
    int w2 = c2.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c2.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w2);

    //end Saturday to start Saturday 
    long days = (c2.getTimeInMillis()-c1.getTimeInMillis())/(1000*60*60*24);
    long daysWithoutWeekendDays = days-(days*2/7);

    // Adjust w1 or w2 to 0 since we only want a count of *weekdays*
    // to add onto our daysWithoutWeekendDays
    if (w1 == Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        w1 = Calendar.MONDAY;
    }

    if (w2 == Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        w2 = Calendar.MONDAY;
    }

    return daysWithoutWeekendDays-w1+w2;
}
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Really impressed with your solution. I was trying to accomplish the same thing but wound up with switches to catch the beginning and end dates on the weekend instead of doing the date shifting. This is much more elegant. –  Joseph Gordon Jan 5 '11 at 5:31
    
@Shengyuan : I know it's a bit late now, but could you please explain the last 2 lines: long days = (c2.getTimeInMillis()-c1.getTimeInMillis())/(1000*60*60*24); long daysWithoutSunday = days-(days*2/7); –  Vrushank May 27 '12 at 6:05

I used Shengyuan Lu's solution, but I needed to make a fix for the case where the method is called when one of the dates is on a Saturday and the other a Sunday - otherwise the answer is off by a day:

static long days(Date start, Date end){
    //Ignore argument check

    Calendar c1 = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
    c1.setTime(start);
    int w1 = c1.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c1.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w1 + 1);

    Calendar c2 = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
    c2.setTime(end);
    int w2 = c2.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
    c2.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, -w2 + 1);

    //end Saturday to start Saturday 
    long days = (c2.getTimeInMillis()-c1.getTimeInMillis())/(1000*60*60*24);
    long daysWithoutSunday = days-(days*2/7);

    if (w1 == Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        w1 = Calendar.MONDAY;
    }
    if (w2 == Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        w2 = Calendar.MONDAY;
    }
    return daysWithoutSunday-w1+w2;
}
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why don't you just edit Shengyuan Lu's solution? –  ymajoros Feb 15 '12 at 8:19

I don't have a Java based solution, but have a PHP one, hope it helps:

function getDate($days) {   
    for ($i = 0; $i < $days; $i ++) {                                      
        if (date('N' , strtotime('+' . ($i + 1) . ' days')) > 5) {  
            $days++;                                                        
        }                                                                   
    }                                                                       

    return date('l, F jS', strtotime('+' . $days . ' days', time()));
}
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Sure, it does help. –  John C Jan 5 '11 at 1:21

The do while in the solution of Piyush is wrong, it should be :

do {
    if (startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SATURDAY && startCal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != Calendar.SUNDAY) {
        ++workDays;
    }
    startCal.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
} while (startCal.getTimeInMillis() < endCal.getTimeInMillis());
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The startCal.add should add onto the Calendar.DATE field, not the Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, I was getting weird results with over Decemeber / January period.

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I don't think that's true, Calendar.DATE is a synonym for Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH –  mbosecke Apr 2 at 18:41

This is my example without looping. It is a class in this example because I serialize it in some JSON output. Basically I work out the number of days between the two dates, divide by 7 and assign to a long to have a integer value for the number of weeks. Take the original number of days and subtract the number of weekends*2. This isn't quite perfect - you need to work out if there is a 'hangover' where the start is close to the end of the week and goes over the weekend. To correct for this I find the day of the week at the start and find the remainder of the number of days, and add those together to find the 'hangover' - and if it is more than 5 it is a weekend. It isn't quite perfect, and does not account for holidays at all. And no Joda in sight. That said there is also a issue with timezones.

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.Date;

public class BusinessDayCalculator implements Serializable {

    private static long DAY = 86400000l;

    private Date startTime;
    private Date endTime;

    public void setStartTime(Date startTime) {
        this.startTime = startTime;
    }

    public Date getStartTime() {
        return startTime;
    }

    public void setEndTime(Date endTime) {
        this.endTime = endTime;
    }

    public Date getEndTime() {
        return endTime;
    }

    public long getHours() {
        return (this.endTime.getTime() - this.startTime.getTime())/(1000*60*60);
    }

    public long getBusinessDays(){

        long startDay = getDayFromDate(this.startTime);
        long endDay = getDayFromDate(this.endTime);

        long totalDays = endDay-startDay;
        long totalWeekends = totalDays/7;

        long day = getDay(this.startTime);

        long hangover = totalDays % 7;

        long intoWeekend = day + hangover;
        if(intoWeekend>5){
            totalWeekends++;
        }

        long totalBusinessDays = totalDays - (totalWeekends *2);

        /*
        System.out.println("Days = " + day );
        System.out.println("Hangover = " + hangover );
        System.out.println("Total Days = " + totalDays);
        System.out.println("Total Weekends = " + totalWeekends);
        System.out.println("Total Business Days = " + totalBusinessDays);
        */

        return totalBusinessDays;
    }

    private long getDayFromDate( Date date ){
        long d = date.getTime() / DAY;
        return d;
    }

    private long getDay( Date date ){
        long daysSinceEpoc = getDayFromDate(date);
        long day = daysSinceEpoc % 7;
        day = day + 4;
        if(day>6) day = day - 7;
        return day;
    }

}
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This code is very error prone. You don't take leap seconds, leap years, etc into consideration. I would suggest you remove this answer, there are good libraries out there for Java (i.e. JodaTime) that get this right. Nice try though :-) –  Daniel L. Aug 6 at 23:19

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