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I'm using a UITableView in my iPhone app, and I have a list of people that belong to a group. I would like it so that when the user clicks on a particular person (thus selecting the cell), the cell grows in height to display several UI controls for editing the properties of that person.

Is this possible?

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7 Answers

I found a REALLY SIMPLE solution to this as a side-effect to a table view I was working on.....

Store the cell height in a variable that reports the original height normally via the heightForCellAt..etc etc then when you want to animate a height change, simply change the value of the variable and call this...

[tableView beginUpdates];
[tableView endUpdates];

You will find it doesn't do a full reload but is enough for the table to know it has to redraw the cells, grabbing the new height value for the cell.... and guess what? It ANIMATES the change for you. Sweet.

I have a more detailed explanation and full code samples on my blog... Animate UITableView Cell Height Change

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It's better than [self.tableView reloadRowsAtIndexPaths:[NSArray arrayWithObject:indexPath] withRowAnimation:YES]; –  iwill Jun 30 '11 at 11:26
3  
This is brilliant. But is there any way we can control the animation speed of the table? –  Josh Kahane Nov 23 '12 at 14:43
11  
This is a bizarre solution, but it's what Apple recommends in the WWDC 2010 "Mastering Table View" session as well. I'm going to file a bug report on adding this to the documentation because I've just spent about 2 hours researching. –  bpapa Feb 21 '13 at 17:32
2  
If you are using an UITextView within the cell that resizes the cell while you type, you need to scroll the textView to the top after the tableView endUpdates: [textView setContentOffset:CGPointMake(0, 0) animated:YES]; –  obiwahn May 11 '13 at 16:53
1  
I have tried this solution and it only works sometimes, when you press a cell there's 50% probability to work. Anyone have the same bug? Its because iOS7? –  Joan Cardona Jan 17 at 12:16
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I like the answer by Simon Lee. I didn't actually try that method but it looks like it would change the size of all the cells in the list. I was hoping for a change of just the cell that is tapped. I kinda did it like Simon but with just a little difference. This will change the look of a cell when it is selected. And it does animate. Just another way to do it.

Create an int to hold a value for the current selected cell index:

int currentSelection;

Then:

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    int row = [indexPath row];
    selectedNumber = row;
    [tableView beginUpdates];
    [tableView endUpdates];
}

Then:

- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

    if ([indexPath row] == currentSelection) {
        return  80;
    }
    else return 40;


}

I am sure you can make similar changes in tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath: to change the type of cell or even load a xib file for the cell.

Like this, the currentSelection will start at 0. You would need to make adjustments if you didn't want the first cell of the list (at index 0) to look selected by default.

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Check the code attached to my post, I did exactly this, double the height for a cell when selected. :) –  Simon Lee Jun 18 '11 at 19:23
1  
"I didn't actually try that method but it looks like it would change the size of all the cells in the list" - then you didn't look very hard. –  jamie Aug 11 '11 at 9:27
2  
The current selection is already stored in tableView.indexPathForSelectedRow. –  Nick Sep 24 '13 at 21:39
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reloadData is no good because there's no animation...

This is what I'm currently trying:

NSArray* paths = [NSArray arrayWithObject:[NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:0 inSection:0]];
[self.tableView beginUpdates];
[self.tableView insertRowsAtIndexPaths:paths withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationFade];
[self.tableView deleteRowsAtIndexPaths:paths withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationFade];
[self.tableView endUpdates];

It almost works right. Almost. I'm increasing the height of the cell, and sometimes there's a little "hiccup" in the table view as the cell is replaced, as if some scrolling position in the table view is being preserved, the new cell (which is the first cell in the table) ends up with its offset too high, and the scrollview bounces to reposition it.

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Personally I found that using this method but with UITableViewRowAnimationNone provides a smoother but still not perfect result. –  Ron Srebro Jan 8 '10 at 3:29
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Add a property to keep track of the selected cell

@property (nonatomic) int currentSelection;

Set it to a sentinel value in (for example) viewDidLoad, to make sure that the UITableView starts in the 'normal' position

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view.

    //sentinel
    self.currentSelection = -1;
}

In heightForRowAtIndexPath you can set the height you want for the selected cell

- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath{
    int rowHeight;
    if ([indexPath row] == self.currentSelection) {
        rowHeight = self.newCellHeight;
    } else rowHeight = 57.0f;
    return rowHeight;
}

In didSelectRowAtIndexPath you save the current selection and save a dynamic height, if required

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
        // do things with your cell here

        // set selection
        self.currentSelection = indexPath.row;
        // save height for full text label
        self.newCellHeight = cell.titleLbl.frame.size.height + cell.descriptionLbl.frame.size.height + 10;

        // animate
        [tableView beginUpdates];
        [tableView endUpdates];
    }
}

In didDeselectRowAtIndexPath set the selection index back to the sentinel value and animate the cell back to normal form

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didDeselectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {       
        // do things with your cell here

        // sentinel
        self.currentSelection = -1;

        // animate
        [tableView beginUpdates];
        [tableView endUpdates];
    }
}
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Get the indexpath of the row selected. Reload the table. In the heightForRowAtIndexPath method of UITableViewDelegate, set the height of the row selected to a different height and for the others return the normal row height

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-1, doesn't work. Calling [table reloadData] results in the height change happening instantly, rather than animating. –  Mark Amery Jul 28 '13 at 16:43
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I just resolved this problem with a little hack:

static int s_CellHeight = 30;
static int s_CellHeightEditing = 60;

- (void)onTimer {
    cellHeight++;
    [tableView reloadData];
    if (cellHeight < s_CellHeightEditing)
    	heightAnimationTimer = [[NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:0.001 target:self selector:@selector(onTimer) userInfo:nil repeats:NO] retain];
}

- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)_tableView heightForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    	if (isInEdit) {
    		return cellHeight;
    	}
    	cellHeight = s_CellHeight;
    	return s_CellHeight;
}

When I need to expand the cell height I set isInEdit = YES and call the method [self onTimer] and it animates the cell growth until it reach the s_CellHeightEditing value :-)

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In the simulator works great, but in the iPhone hardware is laggy. With a 0.05 timer delay and with a cellHeight increase of 5 units, it's much better, but nothing like CoreAnimation –  Dzamir Aug 21 '09 at 17:23
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To my knowledge, the height of the cell itself cannot be animated, however the contentView of the cell, is allowed to be bigger than the cell itself. You may want to animate the size cell's contentView frame and have it draw over the cell below or above it.

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-1 for being straightforwardly wrong; there is now an answer to this question showing that it can in fact be done (albeit via a bizarre and undocumented means). Delete this answer? –  Mark Amery Jul 29 '13 at 12:13
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