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How can I get the name of the script?

For example, I have a perl script with the name XXX.pl. This file contains:

$name = #some function that obtains the script's own name
print $name;

Output:

XXX.pl

I would like to liken this to the CWD function that obtains the scripts directory. I need a function that obtains the script's name as well. Thanks!

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up vote 53 down vote accepted

The name of the running program can be found in the $0 variable:

print $0;

man perlvar for other special variables.

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use File::Basename;
my $name = basename($0);

PS. getcwd() and friends don't give you the script's directory! They give you the working directory. If the script is in your PATH and you just call it by name, not by its full path, then getcwd() won't do what you say. You want dirname($0) (dirname also is in File::Basename).

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You might also be interested in learning more about __FILE__, and possibly __LINE__, which gives you the current line and I frequently use together.

If you want this for debugging purposes, you might also want to learn about "warn", "Carp", "caller".

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Check out module FindBin, part of the core perl distribution. It exports variables you're looking for

  EXPORTABLE VARIABLES
        $Bin         - path to bin directory from where script was invoked
        $Script      - basename of script from which perl was invoked
        $RealBin     - $Bin with all links resolved
        $RealScript  - $Script with all links resolved
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See also stackoverflow.com/a/90721/834416 for a more nuanced answer. – Winston Smith Oct 20 '15 at 22:22

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