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I've got a query that takes an input searches for the closet match in zipcode/region/city/metrocode in a location table containing a few tens of thousands of entries (should be nearly every city in the US). The query I'm using is:

select
  metrocode,
  region,
  postalcode,
  region_full,
  city
from
  dv_location
where
(
  region ilike '%Chicago%'
 or
  postalcode ilike '%Chicago%'
 or
  city ilike '%Chicago%'
 or
  region_full ilike'%Chicago%'
)

 and metrocode is not null

Odd thing is, the results set I'm getting back looks like this:

metrocode;region;postalcode;region_full;city
862;CA;95712;California;Chicago Park
862;CA;95712;California;Chicago Park
602;IL;60611;Illinois;Chicago
602;IL;60610;Illinois;Chicago

What am I doing wrong? My thinking is that Chicago would have greater weight than Chicago Park since Chicago is an exact match to the term (even though I'm asking for a wildcard match on the term).

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Please format your output as code. –  kevpie Jan 5 '11 at 2:35
    
You're really getting duplicate rows returned with that exact query? Or are these unique rows that happen to have the exact same values for the 5 fields you are selecting? –  Phrogz Jan 5 '11 at 2:37
    
The posted result makes perfect sense according to your query. Can you add an example of what you are expecting to see? –  kevpie Jan 5 '11 at 2:53
    
Phrogz: No - the subset of columns just happen to be identical. kevpie: I'm expecting it to match "Chicago" before it matches "Chicago Park", but I might be misunderstanding how a string with % on either side would work. - mu is too short: In short, yes. I'm asking it for all results that are like '%Chicago%', and logically in my mind I would return results that match closest to that term, but my mind doesn't work the way PostgreSQL does. =) –  kagaku Jan 5 '11 at 3:30
1  
@kagaku: The result set order is implementation defined (i.e. as good as random for all practical purposes) if you don't specify the order with an explicit ORDER BY clause. Relational databases and SQL are set based (in the mathematical sense) so there is no implicit ordering, ordering has to be explicitly specified. –  mu is too short Jan 5 '11 at 3:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

select
  metrocode,
  region,
  postalcode,
  region_full,
  city,
  (region = 'Chicago'
   OR postalcode = 'Chicago'
   OR city = 'Chicago'
   OR region_full = 'Chicago') AS full_match
from
  dv_location
where
(
  region ilike '%Chicago%'
 or
  postalcode ilike '%Chicago%'
 or
  city ilike '%Chicago%'
 or
  region_full ilike'%Chicago%'
)
 and metrocode is not null
 order by full_match desc;
share|improve this answer
    
That did it. Thanks! –  kagaku Jan 7 '11 at 19:30

You can set the order explicitly in the order by clause.

...
order by
case
  when city ilike 'Chicago' then 1
  when city ilike 'Chicago%' then 2
  when city ilike '%Chicago%' then 3
  else 4
end

or however you would like your results to be ordered ...

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