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<script>
     function mySlide()
     {
        var myFx = new Fx.Slide('my-slide', {
            duration: 1000,
            transition: Fx.Transitions.Pow.easeOut
        });

        //Toggles between slideIn and slideOut twice:
        myFx.toggle().chain(myFx.toggle);

     }

     var interval = null;

     function clearTime()
     {
        $clear(interval);
     }

     function play()
     {
        interval = mySlide.periodical(1000);
     }
</script>
<div onclick="clearTime();"> stop </div>
<div onclick="play();"> play </div>
<img id="my-slide" src="http://lh5.ggpht.com/_8Nsej4QeRGg/TE5m5zRf4bI/AAAAAAAAAgo/pQGKPX8zn9c/gadget-01.jpg"/>

When I tried the above code with safari, the task manager in windows shows CPU utilisation of 30%-50%

When I put the above code in a full page with other html code, the utilisation is 60%-70%

So what is different? Why is the js faster on a clear page?

share|improve this question
1  
What are your performance percentages relative to? –  jball Jan 5 '11 at 3:55
    
How about in other browsers? –  Chandu Jan 5 '11 at 3:59
    
@jball : not relative to. I tried in computer , once browser but not same page (clear page & html page) -> diffirently perfomance –  Chameron Jan 5 '11 at 4:17
    
@ Cybernate : in this case , IE8 perfomance is 40%-50% (some html page) , so better than safari :D –  Chameron Jan 5 '11 at 4:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because your script affects the page. I presume it adds something to the page, and then animates it. This requires the browser to:

  • search the elements on the page for the position to insert your new element(s) (called DOM traversal - not so much of a problem since you're using an ID, and not complex selectors)
  • calculate and re-render the page as elements get pushed around (called reflow - this is the most expensive)

Therefore in general, the more elements on your page, and the more CSS rules, the longer the DOM traversal and the reflow takes.

More on reflow:

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, i think so. But i want some document for this porblem.I have to report it. Can you show me the source to research ? –  Chameron Jan 5 '11 at 4:21
    
@Chameron, added a link to my answer. –  Box9 Jan 5 '11 at 4:28
    
thank for suggestion –  Chameron Jan 5 '11 at 4:58

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