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I get headaches when I have to write nearly 10 lines of code to say 2 Objects are equal, when their type is equal and both's attribute is equal. You can easily see that in this way of writing the number of lines increase drastically with your number of attributes.

public class Id implements Node {

        private String name;

        public Id(String name) {
                this.name = name;
        }

        public boolean equals(Object o) {
                if (o == null)
                        return false;
                if (null == (Id) o)
                        return false;
                Id i = (Id) o;
                if ((this.name != null && i.name == null) || (this.name == null && i.name != null))
                        return false;
                return (this.name == null && i.name == null) || this.name.equals(i.name);
        }

}
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2  
please see my answer for a proper implementation of equals. Casting something to the wrong type gives you a runtime exception (ClassCastException), not null. Please read effective java for a fantastic explanation. –  Tom Jan 5 '11 at 5:40
1  
Btw - I linked to the actual chapter in effective java in my answer :-). –  Tom Jan 5 '11 at 14:30
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you use Eclipse, click "Source" -> "generate hashCode() and equals()". There're many options to create equals() automatically.

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2  
In my experience, generated tend to get out of sync with the class. But that's nothing a good code review couldn't fix. And I suppose hand written ones can easily have the same problem. –  sblundy Jan 5 '11 at 4:26
    
the easiest way. no need to care about something that is not directly important. anyway, the generated code is not much smaller then mine. Seems it's just the normal case in Java... –  erikb85 Jan 5 '11 at 5:35
    
Let me say two things about this response: (1) don't get fooled into thinking that generated code is always correct. (2) Readability is another concern. –  Tom Jan 5 '11 at 5:41
    
Agreed. Additionally (1) needs unittests, like with your own code. And with (2) we should not forget, that the result can in some cases be better with generators (like in this case), because the author of the generator might have had a better idea of this language/framework/whatever-you-use-it-for then you have. –  erikb85 Jan 5 '11 at 7:20
    
@erikb - you probably want unit tests anyways. I'm not sure I follow what you're saying about (2). Not sure what "better idea" you're talking about. A code generator can't just use any arbitrary library to implement a function for you. You need to have the dependency in your code (and if a code generator added a bunch of deps without you knowing that would be evil). –  Tom Jan 5 '11 at 14:06
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Google's guava library has the Objects class with Objects#equal that handles nullness. It really helps get things smaller. With your example, I would write:

@Override public boolean equals(Object other) {
  if (!(other instanceof Id)) {
    return false;
  }
  Id o = (Id) other;
  return Objects.equal(this.name, o.name);
}

The documentation is here.

Also note that there is Objects#hashCode and Objects#toStringHelper to help with hashCode and toString as well!

Please also see Effective Java 2nd Edition on how to write equals().

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1  
I've updated the link in my answer to link to the relevant chapter in Effective Java! Now there's no excuse not to read it :-). –  Tom Jan 5 '11 at 14:29
    
JDK 7 has a similar Objects.equals method. –  pesche Feb 28 at 7:54
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There are libraries that'll do it for you. For example, commons-lang has EqualsBuilder

Also, these two lines appear to do the same thing:

            if (o == null)
                    return false;
            if (null == (Id) o)
                    return false;

Maybe you meant this:

            if (o == null)
                    return false;
            if (this == o)
                    return true;
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The first if should check if the param, the second if should check the type. When I learned Java a cast returned null on unmatching type. But through my unit tests I already found out, that this seems not to be the case anymore. –  erikb85 Jan 5 '11 at 5:33
    
@erikb: That would result in a ClassCastException. You can just check whether the classes are equal, like so: this.getClass() == o.getClass(). Sub/super classes add some wrinkles though. –  sblundy Jan 5 '11 at 14:06
    
@sblundy: please read effective java which (IIRC) has an explanation of why you should use instanceof instead of getClass(). Josh Bloch does a great job of explaining the correct way to implement equals() and if you have not read it you will almost surely learn something. –  Tom Jan 5 '11 at 14:09
    
@Tom: I have. But in my experience both have their place. –  sblundy Jan 5 '11 at 14:19
1  
@sblundy: java has never returned null when casting to an unmatching type. it has always thrown a ClassCastException. –  jtahlborn Jan 5 '11 at 17:32
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Project Lombok also has a equals and hashCode generator using the @EqualsAndHashCode annotation which has the advantage of being in sync with the current class/source code. I'm not sure about the implementation details but definitely worth looking into if you need to cut down the cruft.

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A simpler way (other than generating the code) might be.

public boolean equals(Object o) {
   return o instanceof Id 
        && (name == null ? ((Id)o).name == null : name.equals(((Id)o).name);
}
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This doesn't generalize very well (at least in terms of readability). It's just less lines for the case where you have one field. My answer still applies here as well: return o instanceof Id && Objects.equal(name, ((Id) o).name); –  Tom Jan 5 '11 at 14:02
    
@Tom, Your answer would scale better, but requires an additional library (I have a helper method to do the same thing ;) I believe this is the shortest complete answer to the question. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 5 '11 at 15:49
    
+1: Shortest correct implementation so far ((null instanceof Object) == false). It is worth noting that if name can never be null, this can be simplified further. –  meriton Jan 6 '11 at 21:54
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