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I have a contact form on a website (a general form: name, email, subject, message) in which mails are sent using google apps smtp to the admins.
Currently if an administrator wants to reply to the mail directly selecting the reply option, the person's reply's To field will be filled by the sender's address automatically.

What I wan't to ask is, Is there any standardized way to pass on some additional info with the mail which would define any reply to the mail should go to this address instead of the sender's?

It does seems that there is a little chance for this option as it may lead to some problems due to spammers (They may define a custom reply field in their mail and a general user might not look where they are replying).

So as an alternative what I thought is to find a way to create a filter with sender's account which figures out the reply email address from the format and forwards the mail (Doesn't seems like a good solution and I have no idea how to achieve this).

I have tagged django, though this is not directly related with this, as I will finally implement this through django.

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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I just googled more (used wrong keywords earlier i guess), looking at the mail transfer protocols, there are infact standardized headers to sepcifie response headers: http://cr.yp.to/immhf/response.html.

As far as implementing this in django is concerned there is an example relating this present in the documentation:

email = EmailMessage('Hello', 'Body goes here', 'from@example.com',
        ['to1@example.com', 'to2@example.com'], ['bcc@example.com'],
        headers = {'Reply-To': 'another@example.com'})

Seems like this should solve my problem.

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Reply-To is a standard SMTP header.

I can't find a good reference for it at the moment, but it is mentioned in the Wikipedia article on Email.

Edit: Found it: RFC 5322, section 3.6.2

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thanks @david, Found the reply to specs in the appendix A.2; Can't this be a little dangerous if spammers spoof the reply to email address? –  crodjer Jan 5 '11 at 5:04
1  
No more than spoofing the from address, which they are already doing. But to the best of my knowledge, most spam is an advertisement, not intended to be replied to, so I don't think the Reply-To address matters much. –  David Yaw Jan 5 '11 at 5:41
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The RFC says you can specify multiple emails and that is what I was looking for. Came up with this:

from django.core.mail import EmailMessage
headers = {'Reply-To': 'email@one.com;email@two.com'}
msg = EmailMessage(subject, html_content, EMAIL_HOST_USER, email_list, headers=headers)
msg.content_subtype = "html"
msg.send()

Works like a charm. Note: EMAIL_HOST_USER is imported from your settings file as per Django doc email setup. More on this here, search for 'reply-to': https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/email/

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