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I am studying using the MIT Courseware and the CLRS book Introduction to Algorithms.

I am currently trying to solve the recurrence (from page 107)

T(n) = 2T(n/2) + n4

If I make a recurrence tree, I get:

Level 0: n4

Level 1 2(n/2)4

Level 2 4(n/4)4

Level 3 8(n/8)4

The tree has lg(n) levels. Therefore I think that the recurrence should be

T(n) = Θ(n4 lg n)

But, If I use the master theorem, I get that

T(n) = Θ(n4)

Clearly both of these can't be right. Which one is correct? And where did I go wrong with my reasoning?

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The second one looks correct. Notice that your recurrence tree looks like

n4 + 2(n/2)4 + 4(n/4)4 + ... + 2i (n / 2i)4

But 2(n/2)4 ≠ n4, because (n/2)4 = n4 / 16, and so 2(n/2)4 = n4/8. In fact, if you work out the math, you get that the work being done at level i is given by

n4 / (2-3i)

So we get (1 + 1/8 + 1/64 + 1/512 + ... ) n4, which can be shown to be less than 2n4. So your function is Θ(n4).

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ah yes, I see my mistake. Nice explanation on why it is less than 2n^4. Thanks – huherto Jan 5 '11 at 5:24

With recursion it is Θ(n^4)

T(n) = 2*T(n/2) + n^4 
T(n) = 2( 2*T(n/4) + (n/2)^4) + n^4 = 4*T(n/4) + 2*(n/2)^4 + n^4
T(n) = 4(2*T(n/8) + (n/4)^4) + 2*(n/2)^4 + n^4 = 8*T(n/8) + 4*(n/4)^4 + 2(n/2)^4 + n^4

T(n) = 8*T(n/8) + n^4*(1 + 1/(2^3) + 1/(2^6))
...

T(n) = 2^k*T(n/(2^k)) + n^4*(1+ 1/(2^3) + 1/(2^6) + 1/(2^9)...+ 1/((2^(k-1))^3)

We know T(1) = 1

n = 2^k so k = log2(n) Then

T(n) = n*T(1) + n^4*( 1 - (1/(2^3))^k)/(1-1/8)

T(n) = n + (8/7)*n^4*(1 - n^(-3))

T(n) = n + (8/7)*(n^4 - n)

T(n) = (8/7)*n^4 - (1/7)*n


Θ(T(n)) = Θ((8/7)*n^4 - (1/7)*n)
Θ(T(n)) = Θ(n^4)

it is Θ(n^4)

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You can use the master theorem here directly.

This equation fits in case 1 of master theorem where log (a) base b < f( n)

a : Number of recurrence b : Number of subparts

log a base b = log 2 base 2 = 1 < n^4

Therefore by masters theorem, T(n) = theta(f(n)) = theta(n^4)

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