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First off, apologies for the long description of my brainspace below. I'm still wrapping my head around lots of these new ideas, so I'm sure I'm describing something incorrectly. Please feel free to correct me where I'm wrong.

We are in the R&D phase of a new ASP.net MVC2 site and want to ensure that we can 1) decouple our data store from our application, 2) allow for our application to be tested via unit tests and 3) allow us to change out our datastore or use something other than Linq2SQL down the line.

This seemingly simple goal has opened up a whole new world to me that includes the Repository pattern, IoC, DI, and all sorts of other things that are making my head swim. Here's what is so far coming into focus, or at least what I believe is a somewhat correct plan to reach our goals:

  1. We will have a number of ISpecificRepository interfaces that define the contract between users of the interface and the underlying data store.

  2. The SpecificRepository implementations will query specific datastores and return POCO representing our domain objects (or collections of them).

  3. Our Service Layer will perform the application specific business logic using an instance of ISpecificRepository passed to the various service methods and pass these POCO domain objects back to our presentation layer.

As mentioned, we are planning on using Linq2SQL to implement our specific repositories for the application and have decided to decouple our service layer from this implementation by creating the POCO for our domain objects and create a mapping to and from these objects to the LINQ generated entities. In the service layer, we can then create business logic to query the repository, add data, and do whatever else we need to do for each use case. This seems fine but my concern is that since we're using Linq2SQL, our specific Linq repository implementation will now have to house all of the many Get queries that the service layer requires to implement the business logic efficiently.

I'm curious as to whether this somehow breaks the Repository pattern since we're now housing application specific logic not in the service layer but in the repository instead.

The reason I feel that we need to do it this way is so that I can write more efficient Linq queries on my specific Linq repository using various DataLoadOptions, etc. without returning IQueryable from my repository up to my service layer, where it would seem that sort of logic actually belongs. Also, all of the example IRepository interfaces I've seen seem very lightweight and only provide a few methods to GetByID, GetAll, Find, Insert, Delete, and SubmitChanges to the underlying data store. In my case, it sounds like my specific repositories will be doing a great deal more than that.

Thanks for reading this far. Any and all help that can clarify my misconceptions would be greatly appreciated.

-Mustafa

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1 Answer 1

our specific Linq repository implementation will now have to house all of the many Get queries that the service layer requires to implement the business logic efficiently.

I'm curious as to whether this somehow breaks the Repository pattern

Not at all. A Repository is a collection of domain entities. If I have a Repository of Accounts, it is perfectly reasonable to want Accounts.ThatAreOverdue().

I personally prefer fluent naming. Accounts.ThatAreOverdue() feels better than AccountRepository.GetOverdue() .. but I suppose that is a point of preference.

Also, all of the example IRepository interfaces I've seen seem very lightweight and only provide a few methods to GetByID, GetAll, Find, Insert, Delete, and SubmitChanges to the underlying data store.

A Repository interface can be thin. Find is meant to be used with the Specification pattern. Encapsulate the criteria in another object. The implementation of the criteria can be passed Linq2Sql objects from which to query - but it will be more difficult to re-use the criteria classes against in-memory domain objects (versus in database, where Linq2Sql is involved).

Our Service Layer will perform the application specific business logic using an instance of ISpecificRepository passed to the various service methods and pass these POCO domain objects back to our presentation layer.

Are you saying that your logic will all be in Services and the "domain objects" will be bags of properties and bound to in the view?

I don't think I'd recommend that.

If the same object that is used in the application logic is also used in the view, then you have tightly coupled the two application layers and experience says that causes problems. It will be very difficult to maintain coherence in the Services and Domain through changes if the View uses the same objects. The View will need pieces of data and they will inevitably get stuck onto places they don't really belong in the domain.

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Thanks for the response - on the last point - all that I meant was that the controller actions in our presentation layer will call the service layer and use the returned results (either POCOs, scalar values, whatever...) to build up their own models for the view. Does that seem like a better explanation? Thanks again. –  Mustafakidd Jan 5 '11 at 16:25
    
Ah, yes. That sounds much better. –  qes Jan 7 '11 at 20:08

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