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In Switch statement

Example

switch (indexPath.row)
case 0:
Loading my nib file;
break;
case 1:
Loading another nib file;
break
default:
break
........

Before loading my nib file. It expects any one statement.

example

case 0:
NSLog(@"");
Loading Nib file....

My its expect the statement NSLog(@"");....... If i need not put NSLog... or any other statement its gives me error.....

I want to know why its like that.

share|improve this question
    
definitely very confusing, I agree –  Jeremy Goodell Jan 5 '11 at 6:34
    
What is your code that loads the nib files? Why are your switch statements missing the curly braces? –  BoltClock Jan 5 '11 at 6:35
    
There was a previous question regarding this, but I can't find that now. –  taskinoor Jan 5 '11 at 6:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's a problem that Objective-C inherited from C in a strange way. Basically the statements in each case have to be in a single block. The compiler figures this out when the statement immediately after the case statement isn't an assignment, but gets confused if it is.

You can solve it the way you did, with the NSLog, or you can simply surround your statements with curly braces to create a block:

case 0: {
    Loading my nib file;
    break; 
}
case 1: {
    Loading another nib file;
    break; 
}

Note that if you don't have an assignment (x = y) right after the case it won't be a problem. For example:

case 0:
    if (a = 1) NSLog(@"This works fine");
    break;

In the later example you gave you instantiated an object right after the case statement -- TestiPhoneCalViewController *testiPhoneCalViewController -- which wasn't an assignment, so it was fine.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the explanation. –  taskinoor Jan 5 '11 at 6:46
    
i agree with you @taskinoor –  Aditya Korde Jan 5 '11 at 6:52
    
....Thanks Friend. –  kiran kumar Jan 5 '11 at 6:58

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