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I've been reading through some of the MIT opencourseware quizes and they had a question that goes like this:

6) Consider the two functions specified below that are used to play a “guess a number game.”

def cmpGuess(guess):
"""Assumes that guess is an integer in range(maxVal). returns -1 if guess is < than the magic number, 0 if it is equal to the magic number and 1 if it is greater than the magic number."""
def findNumber(maxVal):
"""Assumes that maxVal is a positive integer. Returns a number, num, such that cmpGuess(num) == 0."""
Write a Python implementation of findNumber that guesses the magic number defined by cmpGuess. Your program should have the lowest time complexity possible. """

Here's my implementation:

def find(maxVal):
    ceiling = maxVal
    floor = 0

    while 1:
        med = ((ceiling + floor) / 2)
        res = cmp(med)
        if res == 1:
            ceiling = med
        elif res == -1:
            floor = med
        else:
            return med

And here's the answer sheet implementation provided by the teacher:

def findNumber(maxVal): 
    """ Assumes that maxVal is a positive integer. Returns a number, num, such that cmpGuess(num) == 0 """ 
    s = range(0, maxVal) 
    return bsearch(s, 0, len(s) -1)

def bsearch(s, first, last): 
    if (last-first) < 2: 
        if cmp(s[first]) == 0: 
            return first 
    else:
        return last

    mid = first + (last -first)/2
    if cmp(s[mid]) == 0:
        return s[mid]
    if cmp(s[mid]) == -1:
        return bsearch(s, first, mid -1)
    return bsearch(s, mid + 1, last)

This is the cmp function used by both our functions, according to spec:

def cmp(guess):
    if guess > num:
        return 1
    elif guess < num:
        return -1
    else: return 0

One major difference is that my solution is iterative and that of the teacher is recursive. I timed 1000 runs of both our functions with a maxVal = 1,000,000. Here's the timing snippet:

t = timeit.Timer('find(1000000)', 'from __main__ import find,cmp')
t1 = timeit.Timer('findNumber(1000000)', 'from __main__ import findNumber,bsearch')
print str(t.timeit(1000))
print str(t1.timeit(1000))

My run took: 0.000621605333677s The teachers run took: 29.627s
This can't possibly be right. I timed this several times in a row, and in all instances the second function came in with ridiculous 30s results. I copy pasted the solution function straight from the document provided by MIT. Any ideas?

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3  
First question (I assume you checked that first, but let's be sure): Do both give the correct answers? As the saying goes: If it doesn't have to be correct, I can get it down to as little as 0s. –  delnan Jan 5 '11 at 9:00
    
s = range(0, maxVal)??? The teacher's solution requires O(maxval) space. –  Bolo Jan 5 '11 at 9:01
    
Yep, both are correct, one is just orders of magnitude slower than the other. –  Steve Jan 5 '11 at 9:03
1  
@Abhinav: Nay to the second suggestion, len is O(1) on lists (and also on most other collections and sequences, including dicts, sets and strings). –  delnan Jan 5 '11 at 9:09
1  
I cannot reproduce the long time for the teacher's version, using time.time(). Can you test it? Can you also check whether you're swapping? –  TryPyPy Jan 5 '11 at 9:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You said that you tested both scripts to make sure that they give the same answer, but they don't. The teacher's script, as you have it written, will always return the last element. This is because of these lines:

def bsearch(s, first, last): 
    if (last-first) < 2: 
        if cmp(s[first]) == 0: 
            return first 
    else:
        return last

should be

def bsearch(s, first, last): 
    if (last-first) < 2: 
        if cmp(s[first]) == 0: 
            return first 
        else:
            return last

In other words, there is an indentation error, which I realize is also in the pdf on MIT's site. Second, the teacher's script still won't work correctly (it will always return the last number) because his binary search is going in the wrong direction with the result of cmp. This is a fault with the teacher's solution according to the spec and easily fixed by changing the line

    if cmp(s[mid]) == -1:

to

    if cmp(s[mid]) == 1:

This wasn't really an answer to the question of slowness which is obviously (as has been pointed out) due to the allocation of O(N) memory (this is the big one), recursion, list look-ups, calling cmp potentially twice for each bsearch call rather than once and storing the result, and having to check explicitly if (last - first) < 2 for each call to bsearch because he is using the variable last as being included in the range of possible values rather than it being 1 more than the highest possible value. By the way, your own code can be made a tad bit faster by changing the line:

            floor = med

to

            floor = med + 1

so that you are excluding med from the search range. You already know that it isn't the value based on the cmp result. By the way, I wouldn't use cmp as my own function name because it is a Python built-in function (I know that it is cmpGuess in the spec).

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Just wondering, did you take that course or are you following the Opencourseware stuff as well? –  Steve Jan 6 '11 at 0:10
    
No, I haven't taken the course or looked at it on OCW before, but I have looked at some others. I just decided to look at the original solution when I noticed first error (indentation). I sent an email to OCW about these problems so that hopefully the solution will be corrected. –  Justin Peel Jan 6 '11 at 0:51

The most obvious thing I can see is that every time you call the teacher's function it creates a list of 1,000,000 integers (assuming Python 2.x), and then when it returns it destroys that list again.

That is going to take a while.

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1  
Ah, yes - that could indeed take quite a while. Totally forgot that range creates a list (Python 3 range creates a smart iterator instead that even provides - cheap, because it's clever and calculates the nth item from the arguments - indexing). –  delnan Jan 5 '11 at 9:06
    
You can use xrange in earlier versions of python to lazily generate iterators. In fact, is there ever a reason not to use xrange? –  pisswillis Jan 5 '11 at 17:54
    
@pisswillis, yes but not often. For example, you can't slice xrange (or range in Python 3.x). –  Duncan Jan 5 '11 at 19:13

Let me repeat my comment in the form of an answer: range(maxval) allocates the entire list, so the teacher's algorithm has Θ(maxval) space complexity and thus Θ(maxval) time complexity (creating such a list takes time). Therefore, the teacher's solution does not have "the lowest time complexity possible."

When xrange(maxval) is used instead, the entire list is not allocated anymore. Both yours and the teacher's solutions have Θ(log(maxval)) time complexity.

Moreover, your solution has Θ(1) space complexity, while the (optimized) teacher's solution has Θ(log(maxval)) space complexity ­– recursive calls consume stack memory.

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There are three things wrong with the teacher's version, all of which have been fixed in the OP's version.

  1. s = range(maxVal) creates a list in Python 2. Using xrange() saves the time to create the list and destroy it. However the whole idea of using s is a nonsense, because s[i] == i for all relevant i, so s can be just thrown away, saving the look-up.

  2. Recursion: The recursion depth is about math.log(1000000.0, 2.0) ... about 20. So that's about 20 function calls per call of findNumber(), and function calls are very expensive compared to the jump back to the start of a while loop.

  3. It calls cmp(s[mid]) twice per guess instead of once, so that's another 20 wasted function calls per call of findNumber().

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I don't have Python installed at the moment, so from a glance maybe because the teacher used recursion (in the bsearch) ?

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2  
That would explain a notable slowdown or maximum recursion depth exceeded, but not a 47662x slowdown. –  delnan Jan 5 '11 at 9:03
    
@delnan: The max recursion depth is about math.log(1000000.0, 2.0) ... about 20. –  John Machin Jan 5 '11 at 10:04

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