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I've come across a routine that does something like this:

static public Bitmap byte2bmp(byte[] BitmapData)
{
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(BitmapData);
    return (new Bitmap(ms));
}

I'm worried this might not be the best recommended approach. Does the ms gets disposed properly in this scenario?

Or would it be better to assign the result to a temporary Bitmap, dispose of the stream, and then return the temp object?

static public Bitmap byte2bmp(byte[] BitmapData)
{
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(BitmapData);
    Bitmap temp=new Bitmap(ms);
    ms.Dispose();
    return (temp);
}

I was hoping the "using" might be used in this scenario, but am not sure it would behave properly or not:

static public Bitmap byte2bmp(byte[] BitmapData)
{
    using(MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(BitmapData))
    {
    return (new Bitmap(ms));
    }
}

What is the most effective/proper solution? Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're correct in worrying that the first approach will fail to dipose ms. As a matter of good practice, you should always call the Dispose method on objects that implement IDisposable.

I recommend adopting the last approach. You can be confident that a using statement will dispose of the object as expected even if you return in the middle of it.

Here's how the code would break down during run time: First, the return expression will be evaluated, then the try-finally block (for which the using statement is simply syntactic sugar) will be executed, and finally the method will return.

The only case in which you might encounter issues with returning in the middle of a using statement is if you return the variable from the using statement itself. Of course, this would cause issues anyway if you retained any reference to the variable beyond the scope of the using block.

Also see: Best practice regarding returning from using blocks

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@LukeH: I'm not sure I understand what you mean. The C# spec indicates that the return expression will be evaluated first before the finally block that handles the disposal of the stream object, so whatever the Bitmap constructor decided to do would be irrelevant. –  Cody Gray Jan 5 '11 at 10:21
3  
I was wrong, but not in that way. The Bitmap class will potentially break if you close/dispose the stream. From MSDN: "You must keep the stream open for the lifetime of the Bitmap." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z7ha67kw.aspx –  LukeH Jan 5 '11 at 10:25
    
@LukeH: Ah, okay. I'd never noticed that before. What reason do you now have to believe that wouldn't cause any problems and/or that the fact the above code works isn't simply relying on an implementation detail? –  Cody Gray Jan 5 '11 at 10:25
    
In my original comment I said that the Bitmap class shouldn't/wouldn't do this because it's bad practice. I was wrong because it does, unfortunately. (Presumably it holds a reference to the stream internally and then re-uses it later, rather than eagerly converting the stream to a byte[] or whatever when the constructor is first called.) –  LukeH Jan 5 '11 at 10:34
    
Would using a return (new Bitmap(ms).Clone(rect,pixFormat)) "bypass" that requirement of having the stream open during the original BMP lifetime? –  ptnik Jan 5 '11 at 15:13

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