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I'm currently translating an algorithm in Python to C++.

This line EXCH_SYMBOL_SETS = [["i", "1", "l"], ["s", "5"], ["b", "8"], ["m", "n"]] is now

    vector<vector<char>> exch_symbols;

    vector<char> vector_1il;
    vector_1il.push_back('1');
    vector_1il.push_back('i');
    vector_1il.push_back('l');

    vector<char> vector_5s;
    vector_5s.push_back('5');
    vector_5s.push_back('s');

    vector<char> vector_8b;
    vector_8b.push_back('8');
    vector_8b.push_back('b');

    vector<char> vector_mn;
    vector_mn.push_back('m');
    vector_mn.push_back('n');

    exch_symbols.push_back(vector_1il);
    exch_symbols.push_back(vector_5s);
    exch_symbols.push_back(vector_8b);
    exch_symbols.push_back(vector_mn);

I hate to have an intermediate named variable for each inner variable in a 2-D vector. I'm not really familiar with multidimensional datastructures in C++. Is there a better way?

What's happening afterwards is this:

multimap<char, char> exch_symbol_map;

/*# Insert all possibilities
    for symbol_set in EXCH_SYMBOL_SETS:
        for symbol in symbol_set:
            for symbol2 in symbol_set:
                if symbol != symbol2:
                    exch_symbol_map[symbol].add(symbol2)*/
void insert_all_exch_pairs(const vector<vector<char>>& exch_symbols) {
    for (vector<vector<char>>::const_iterator symsets_it = exch_symbols.begin();
        symsets_it != exch_symbols.end(); ++symsets_it) {
            for (vector<char>::const_iterator sym1_it = symsets_it->begin();
                sym1_it != symsets_it->end(); ++sym1_it) {
                    for (vector<char>::const_iterator sym2_it = symsets_it->begin();
                        sym2_it != symsets_it->end(); ++sym2_it) {
                            if (sym1_it != sym2_it) {
                                exch_symbol_map.insert(pair<char, char>(*sym1_it, *sym2_it));
                            }
                    }
            }
    }
}

So this algorithm should work in one way or another with the representation here. The goal is that EXCH_SYMBOL_SETS can be easily changed later to include new groups of chars or add new letters to existing groups. Thank you!

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1  
When you translate higher-level languages to lower-level, you get a lot of ugly, inelegant, non-idiomatic, non-optimal code. Get used to it. –  delnan Jan 5 '11 at 11:07
    
You're totally right. But the question is really, how do I handle multi-dimensional vectors in python? I don't even know how how I would translate L = [A, [B], [[C], D]]] to C++ ... at all! … also, I don't need to stick to this algorithm. I would like to write it more optimal, if possible. The thing is, I think I wouldn't have come up with anything better even if I had started this project in C++ instead of Python. –  Felix Dombek Jan 5 '11 at 11:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would refactor, instead of vector<char>, use std::string as internal, i.e.

vector<string> exch_symbols;
exch_symbols.push_back("1il");
exch_symbols.push_back("s5");
exch_symbols.push_back("b8");
exch_symbols.push_back("mn");

then change your insert method:

void insert_all_exch_pairs(const vector<string>& exch_symbols) 
{
  for (vector<string>::const_iterator symsets_it = exch_symbols.begin(); symsets_it != exch_symbols.end(); ++symsets_it) 
  {
    for (string::const_iterator sym1_it = symsets_it->begin();  sym1_it != symsets_it->end(); ++sym1_it) 
    {
      for (string::const_iterator sym2_it = symsets_it->begin(); sym2_it != symsets_it->end(); ++sym2_it) 
      {
        if (sym1_it != sym2_it)
          exch_symbol_map.insert(pair<char, char>(*sym1_it, *sym2_it));
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Every answer is nice, but this is surely the way to go. I didn't know that string had an iterator. (My lecturer spent his C++ lectures with teaching us how to write our own string class, sadly. He should've read Bjarne's book on how to teach C++ …) –  Felix Dombek Jan 5 '11 at 11:32
    
btw. do you realise that the above algorithm doesn't necessarily create all mappings? for example, i1l, only thee pairs are generated i1, 1i, li (reason being that the other pair is skipped because it's the same key) - is this what you want? if not, I'd suggest changing map to multimap –  Nim Jan 5 '11 at 12:16
    
I don't see where this is true. First, I already use a multimap (see first line of second code snippet) and also the algorithm iterates through the whole square {i, 1, l} x {i, 1, l} and only drops a pair if it's xx. It should generate {i1, il, 1i, 1l, l1, li} and work fine. –  Felix Dombek Jan 5 '11 at 17:33
    
@Felix, oops, missed that, in my test proggy I used map! I blame late night coding... :) –  Nim Jan 5 '11 at 17:46

You could shorten it by getting rid of the intermediate values

vector<vector<char> > exch_symbols(4, vector<char>()); //>> is not valid in C++98 btw.
//exch_symbols[0].reserve(3)
exch_symbols[0].push_back('i');
etc.

You could also use boost.assign or something similiar
EXCH_SYMBOL_SETS = [["i", "1", "l"], ["s", "5"], ["b", "8"], ["m", "n"]] then becomes vector<vector<char>> exch_symbols(list_of(vector<char>(list_of('i')('1')('l')))(vector<char>(list_of('s')('5'))(list_of('m')('n'))) (not tested and never used it with nested vectors, but it should be something like this)

share|improve this answer

Your code:

    vector<char> vector_1il;
    vector_1il.push_back('1');
    vector_1il.push_back('i');
    vector_1il.push_back('l');

Concise code:

char values[] = "1il";
vector<char> vector_1il(&values[0], &values[3]);

Is it fine with you?


If you want to use std::string as suggested by Nim, then you can use even this:

//Concise form of what Nim suggested!
std::string s[] = {"1il", "5s", "8b", "mn"};
vector<std::string> exch_symbols(&s[0], &s[4]);

Rest you can follow Nim's post. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your edit! this is really nice –  Felix Dombek Jan 5 '11 at 12:39

For your real question of...

how could I translate L = [A, [B], [[C], D]]] to C++ ... at all!

There is no direct translation - you've switched from storing values of the same type to storing values of variable type. Python allows this because it's a dynamically typed language, not because it has a nicer array syntax.

There are ways to replicate the behaviour in C++ (e.g. a vector of boost::any or boost::variant, or a user defined container class that supports this behviour), but it's never going to be as easy as it is in Python.

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In c++0x the instruction
vector<string> EXCH_SYMBOL_SETS={"i1l", "s5", "b8", "mn"} ;
compiles and works fine. Sadly enough the apparently similar statement
vector<vector<char>> EXCH_SYMBOL_SETS={{'i','1','l'},{'s','5'}, {'b','8'}, {'m','n'}};
doesn't work :-(.

This is implemented in g++ 4.5.0 or later you should add the -std=c++0x option. I think this feature is not yet avaliable in microsoft c (VC10), and I don't know what's the status of other compilers.

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