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if (window.XMLHttpRequest) { 
 xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest(); 
} else { 
 xmlhttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP"); //If browser == IE, get ActiveX object
} 
  xmlhttp.open("GET", 'questions.xml', false);  //Open the file using the GET routine
  xmlhttp.send();  //Send request
  xmlDoc = xmlhttp.responseXML;  //xmlDoc holds the document information now
}
console.log(xmlhttp.responseText);

So, that code, for some reason, won't work in Chrome (any version) - any ideas peeps? - it's been driving me insane.

aaaand, my XML:

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<Answers>

    <Question1 q="&lt;h2 style='font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; color: #333333; padding-bottom: 15px;'&gt;What's the right colour?&lt;br /&gt;" a1="A) Blue" a2="B) Purple" a3="C) Green" a4="C) Red" p1="50" p2="25" p3="10" p4="15">
        <Answer>a3</Answer>
    </Question1>

</Answers>
share|improve this question
    
Is your file a valid XML document? – lonesomeday Jan 5 '11 at 11:25
    
Added my XML to the question. – Barrie Reader Jan 5 '11 at 11:26
    
OK, two more questions. 1. Is the XML being received? If you do console.log(xmlhttp.responseText), what do you get? 2. What content type is being sent? Is it application/xml? – lonesomeday Jan 5 '11 at 11:31
    
In Firefox and IE I get the XML fed back correctly, in Chrome I don't get anything - it doesn't even reach the console.log() line (question updated) – Barrie Reader Jan 5 '11 at 11:38
    
How can I check the content type for the XML? – Barrie Reader Jan 5 '11 at 11:40
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Put in this conditional statement:

if ($.browser.msie) {
                    xmlhttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP"); //If browser == IE, get ActiveX object
                    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function() {
                        if(xmlhttp.readyState == 4) {
                        //alert(xmlhttp.responseText); //debugging...
                        }
                    }
                    xmlhttp.open("GET", 'questions.xml', false);  //Open the file using the GET routine
                    xmlhttp.send(null);  //Send request
                    xmlDoc = xmlhttp.responseXML;  //xmlDoc holds the document information now
                    } else if ($.browser.firefox) {
                    xmlhttp = new document.XMLHttpRequest();
                    xmlhttp.open("GET", 'questions.xml', false);  //Open the file using the GET routine
                    xmlhttp.send(null);  //Send request
                    xmlDoc = xmlhttp.responseXML;  //xmlDoc holds the document information now
                    } else {
                    xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
                    xmlhttp.open("GET", 'questions.xml', false);  //Open the file using the GET routine
                    xmlhttp.send(null);  //Send request
                    xmlDoc = xmlhttp.responseXML;  //xmlDoc holds the document information now
            }

Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Ah - love-er-ley! – Barrie Reader Jan 5 '11 at 15:49

Could it be that in Chrome, send() is asynchronous, ie the result is not yet in when the code continues with the next statement (ie xmlDoc = ...)?

[EDIT] you could test that by stepping through the code (JavaScript debug) and pause right after the send() request. Wait for a while (check resources tab) and continue. A quick Google learned me that there's an parameter to specify (a)synchronous-ness (link)

[EDIT] nevermind, was worth a try. Another perhaps-helpfull-remark, here's a code snippet I found. It is worth a try, especially because there's some extra fault-reporting:

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function()
    { 
        alert( "Wait server..." + xmlhttp.readyState );
        if(xmlhttp.readyState == 4)
        {
            if(xmlhttp.status == 200)
            {
                alert("Received:" + xmlhttp.responseText);  
            }   
            else    
            {
                alert("Error: returned status code " + req.status + " " + xmlhttp.statusText);
            }   
        } 
    }; 
    xmlhttp.open("GET", "questions.xml", true); 
    xmlhttp.send(null);
share|improve this answer
    
hmm, interesting - could you elaborate please? – Barrie Reader Jan 5 '11 at 11:27
1  
That's the point of false in the open call. – lonesomeday Jan 5 '11 at 11:27
    
Ah, @lonesomeday is correct :) – Barrie Reader Jan 5 '11 at 11:28

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