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I would like to change the directory name of a git submodule in my git superproject.

Lets suppose I have the following entry in my .gitmodules file:

[submodule ".emacs.d/vimpulse"]  
path = .emacs.d/vimpulse  
url = git://gitorious.org/vimpulse/vimpulse.git

What do I have to type to move the .emacs.d/vimpulse directory to .emacs.d/vendor/vimpulse without deleting it first (explained here and here) and then readding it.

Does git really need the whole path in the submodule tag

[submodule ".emacs.d/vimpulse"]

or is it also possible to store just the name of the subproject ?

[submodule "vimpulse"]

edit:

Beginning with Git 1.8.5 moving submodules is supported natively using the git mv command.

Taken from the release notes of 1.8.5:

  • "git mv A B" when moving a submodule has been taught to relocate the submodule's working tree and to adjust the paths in the .gitmodules file.
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NOTE: the OP answers his/her own question with the git mv command, right in the question. –  Yar Apr 15 at 0:02
    
HOWEVER, you cannot use git mv like this. Use deinit then rm as specified stackoverflow.com/a/18892438/8047. –  Yar Apr 15 at 14:56
    
@Yar: at least on git 2.0.0, git mv just works for submodules also, no need for anything else. –  Pedro Romano Jun 26 at 7:55
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9 Answers

up vote 85 down vote accepted

It’s similar to how you remove a submodule (see How do I remove a Git submodule?):

  1. Edit .gitmodules and change the path of the submodule appropriately, and put it in the index with git add .gitmodules.
  2. If needed, create the parent directory of the new location of the submodule (mkdir -p new/parent).
  3. Move all content from the old to the new directory (mv -vi old/parent/submodule new/parent/submodule).
  4. Make sure Git tracks this directory (git add new/parent).
  5. Remove the old directory with git rm --cached old/parent/submodule.
  6. Move the directory .git/modules/old/parent/submodule with all its content to .git/modules/new/parent/submodule.
  7. Edit the .git/module/new/parent/config, make sure that worktree item points to the new locations, so in this example it should be worktree = ../../../../../new/parent/module. Typically there should be two more .. then directories in the direct path in that place.
  8. Edit the file new/parent/module/.git, make sure that the path in it points to the correct new location inside the main project .git folder, so in this example gitdir: ../../../.git/modules/new/parent/submodule.

    git status output looks like this for me afterwards:

    # On branch master
    # Changes to be committed:
    #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
    #
    #       modified:   .gitmodules
    #       renamed:    old/parent/submodule -> new/parent/submodule
    #
    
  9. Finally, commit the changes.

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20  
When you update .gitmodules make sure you update both that path configuration and the submodule's name. For example, in moving foo/module to bar/module you must change in .gitmodules the section [submodule "foo/module"] to [submodule "bar/module"], and under that same section path = foo/module to path = bar/module. Also, you must change in .git/config the section [submodule "foo/module"] to [submodule "bar/module"]. –  wilhelmtell Nov 12 '11 at 14:11
2  
It didn't work for me either... the closest solution I've found is deleting a submodule (a pain) and then re-add it in the different location. –  pablox Dec 6 '11 at 1:29
25  
A very-very important note: If you get fatal: 'git status --porcelain' failed in... just delete any .git files or directories in the submodule. –  antitoxic Mar 11 '12 at 9:14
2  
The order of steps was wrong for me. git add new/parent didn’t do anything after mkdir, which makes sense, because Git can’t track empty directories. I had to git add new/parent after moving the submodule directory with mv. –  Rory O'Kane Aug 27 '12 at 19:46
18  
It looks like this post misses a few steps, such as editing .git/modules/old/parent/submodule, moving it to the new location, updating gitdir in old/parent/submodule/.git... –  szx Mar 28 '13 at 13:48
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In my case, I wanted to move a submodule from one directory into a subdirectory, e.g. "AFNetworking" -> "ext/AFNetworking". These are the steps I followed:

  1. Edit .gitmodules changing submodule name and path to be "ext/AFNetworking"
  2. Move submodule's git directory from ".git/modules/AFNetworking" to ".git/modules/ext/AFNetworking"
  3. Move library from "AFNetworking" to "ext/AFNetworking"
  4. Edit ".git/modules/ext/AFNetworking/config" and fix the [core] worktree line. Mine changed from ../../../AFNetworking to ../../../../ext/AFNetworking
  5. Edit "ext/AFNetworking/.git" and fix gitdir. Mine changed from ../.git/modules/AFNetworking to ../../git/modules/ext/AFNetworking
  6. git add .gitmodules
  7. git rm --cached AFNetworking
  8. git submodule add -f <url> ext/AFNetworking

Finally, I saw in the git status:

matt$ git status
# On branch ios-master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   modified:   .gitmodules
#   renamed:    AFNetworking -> ext/AFNetworking

Et voila. The above example doesn't change the directory depth, which makes a big difference to the complexity of the task, and doesn't change the name of the submodule (which may not really be necessary, but I did it to be consistent with what would happen if I added a new module at that path.)

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3  
Thanks Matt. I was lost on the accepted answer. Thank you for covering more than the base case. This worked like a charm. –  Andrew Hubbs Jan 22 '13 at 0:19
    
You don't need to shuffle around .git/modules paths, or change the name of the submodule (as arand and Bob Bell mention). Though, doing so may keep things cleaner. –  gatoatigrado Mar 25 '13 at 21:51
    
Don't forget to do steps 2, 3, 4 and 5 recursively for any sub-submodules. –  herzbube Oct 5 '13 at 18:33
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The trick seems to be understanding that the .git directory for submodules are now kept in the master repository, under .git/modules, and each submodule has a .git file that points to it. This is the procedure you need now:

  • Move the submodule to its new home.
  • Edit the .git file in the submodule's working directory, and modify the path it contains so that it points to the right directory in the master repository's .git/modules directory.
  • Enter the master repository's .git/modules directory, and find the directory corresponding to your submodule.
  • Edit the config file, updating the worktree path so that it points to the new location of the submodule's working directory.
  • Edit the .gitmodules file in the root of the master repository, updating the path to the working directory of the submodule.
  • git add -u
  • git add <parent-of-new-submodule-directory> (It's important that you add the parent, and not the submodule directory itself.)

A few notes:

  • The [submodule "submodule-name"] lines in .gitmodules and .git/config must match each other, but don't correspond to anything else.
  • The submodule working directory and .git directory must correctly point to each other.
  • The .gitmodules and .git/config files should be synchronised.
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You can just add a new submodule and remove the old submodule using standard commands. (should prevent any accidental errors inside of .git)

Example setup:

mkdir foo; cd foo; git init; 
echo "readme" > README.md; git add README.md; git commit -m "First"
## add submodule
git submodule add git://github.com/jquery/jquery.git
git commit -m "Added jquery"
## </setup example>

Examle move 'jquery' to 'vendor/jquery/jquery' :

oldPath="jquery"
newPath="vendor/jquery/jquery"
orginUrl=`git config --local --get submodule.${oldPath}.url`

## add new submodule
mkdir -p `dirname "${newPath}"`
git submodule add -- "${orginUrl}" "${newPath}"

## remove old submodule
git config -f .git/config --remove-section "submodule.${oldPath}"
git config -f .gitmodules --remove-section "submodule.${oldPath}"
git rm --cached "${oldPath}"
rm -rf "${oldPath}"              ## remove old src
rm -rf ".git/modules/${oldPath}" ## cleanup gitdir (housekeeping)

## commit
git add .gitmodules
git commit -m "Renamed ${oldPath} to ${newPath}"

Bonus method for large submodules:

If the submodule is large and you prefer not to wait for the clone, you can create the new submodule using the old as origin, and then switch the origin.

Example (use same example setup)

oldPath="jquery"
newPath="vendor/jquery/jquery"
baseDir=`pwd`
orginUrl=`git config --local --get submodule.${oldPath}.url`

# add new submodule using old submodule as origin
mkdir -p `dirname "${newPath}"`
git submodule add -- "file://${baseDir}/${oldPath}" "${newPath}"

## change origin back to original
git config -f .gitmodules submodule."${newPath}".url "${orginUrl}"
git submodule sync -- "${newPath}"

## remove old submodule
...
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If you're not using head, you may also need to check out the correct version of the module at newPath. –  noa Nov 29 '13 at 19:55
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The string in quotes after "[submodule" doesn't matter. You can change it to "foobar" if you want. It's used to find the matching entry in ".git/config".

Therefore, if you make the change before you run "git submodule init", it'll work fine. If you make the change (or pick up the change through a merge), you'll need to either manually edit .git/config or run "git submodule init" again. If you do the latter, you'll be left with a harmless "stranded" entry with the old name in .git/config.

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This is really annoying, but you're right. The worst part is, if you just change the URL, running git init doesn't seem to update it, you do have to edit .git/config manually. –  crimson_penguin Jan 6 '12 at 20:09
1  
in this case git submodule sync propagates the change to .git/config automatically –  CharlesB Apr 25 '12 at 20:12
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What worked for me was to remove the old submodule using git submodule deinit <submodule> followed by git rm <submodule-folder>. Then add the submodule again with the new folder name and commit. Checking git status before committing shows the old submodule renamed to the new name and .gitmodule modified.

$ git submodule deinit foo
$ git rm foo
$ git submodule add https://bar.com/foo.git new-foo
$ git status
renamed:    foo -> new-foo
modified:   .gitmodules
$ git commit -am "rename foo submodule to new-foo"
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1  
This requires git 1.8.3 or higher. See this post for upgrading your git: evgeny-goldin.com/blog/3-ways-install-git-linux-ubuntu –  Michael Cole Feb 7 at 13:35
1  
Or, a better way: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:git-core/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install git –  Michael Cole Feb 7 at 13:43
    
@MichaelCole Thanks! Right you are! See Git-1.8.3 Release Notes. FYI: Ubuntu-13.10 (Saucy Salamander) has Git-1.8.3.2, but good to know there is ppa. Also, IMHO git subtree merge strategy is a better approach; I have abandoned submodules for my own projects. Still good to understand for existing projects. –  Mark Mikofski Feb 7 at 19:51
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The given solution did not work for me, however a similar version did...

This is with a cloned repository, hence the submodule git repos are contained in the top repositories .git dir. All cations are from the top repository:

  1. Edit .gitmodules and change the "path =" setting for the submodule in question. (No need to change the label, nor to add this file to index.)

  2. Edit .git/modules/name/config and change the "worktree =" setting for the submodule in question

  3. run:

    mv submodule newpath/submodule
    git add -u
    git add newpath/submodule
    

I wonder if it makes a difference if the repositories are atomic, or relative submodules, in my case it was relative (submodule/.git is a ref back to topproject/.git/modules/submodule)

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Just use the shell script git-submodule-move.

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Seems not to work on OSX, unfortunately. –  Yar Apr 14 at 23:51
    
Heh, I looked up this question again, and used one of the higher voted answers, and now I wish that I'd scrolled down and seen my previous answer which I'd forgotten about. –  Flimm May 19 at 14:07
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I just went through this ordeal yesterday and this answer worked perfectly. Here are my steps, for clarity:

  1. Ensure that submodule is checked in and pushed to its server. You also need to know what branch its on.
  2. You need the URL of your submodule! Use more .gitmodules because once you delete the submodule it's not going to be around
  3. Now you can use deinit, rm and then submodule add

EXAMPLE

COMMANDS

    git submodule deinit Classes/lib/mustIReally
    git rm foo
    git submodule add http://developer.audiob.us/download/SDK.git lib/AudioBus

    # do your normal commit and push
    git commit -a 

NOTE: git mv doesn't do this. At all.

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2  
Good summary. +1 git mv should be better in the very last versions of Git though. –  VonC Apr 15 at 15:08
    
@VonC I tested on git 1.8.5, pretty sure that's about as good as it gets for mv. Thanks! –  Yar Jun 1 at 2:34
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