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I'm trying to check how many times certain lines are executed in few timesteps, here is part of my code: 1)write "countd" every time:

real(kind=8) function dergfm(jp,ip,lp)
integer :: jp,ip,lp,countd
real(kind=8) press
    .
    .
    .
   countd=countd+1
   !if (countd < 5) then 
   print*, "countd= ", countd
   !endif
    .
    .
    .
end function dergfm

result:

countd=            1
.
.
.
countd=            21504

2)write "countd" first 4 times:

    real(kind=8) function dergfm(jp,ip,lp)
integer :: jp,ip,lp,countd
real(kind=8) press
    .
    .
    .
   countd=countd+1
   if (countd < 5) then 
   print*, "countd= ", countd
   endif
    .
    .
    .
end function dergfm

results:

countd=            1
countd=            2
countd=            3
countd=            4

3)write "countd" larger than 5

    real(kind=8) function dergfm(jp,ip,lp)
integer :: jp,ip,lp,countd
real(kind=8) press
    .
    .
    .
   countd=countd+1
   if (countd > 5) then 
   print*, "countd= ", countd
   endif
    .
    .
    .
end function dergfm

results:

[none]

It looks like comparing these integers works for .lt. but doesn't for .gt. (nor .eq.)

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1  
Are you sure the inputs and all the global variables are the same for each run? If so, it appears that you've hit on something very odd and bug-like. But, to demonstrate, you'd have to convincingly show that everything else was unchanged. And if you omit the material with represented by the dots, no doubt it performs correctly. You need to save your current test case, and then work on reducing the volume of code to the bare minimum that still reproduces the problem. Then submit the bug report to the compiler vendor. (The bare minimum should be 50 lines or less, just to give you a target.) –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 5 '11 at 13:51
    
@J. Leffler: While a compiler bug is of course a possibility, in 99.9% of the cases the culprit is in the user code, e.g. in this case some array bounds error which clobbers countd. Or something else which we can't see because it's hidden behind the "..." parts the OP didn't feel like sharing. –  janneb Jan 5 '11 at 14:59
    
Thanks for all the answers I am going to check your suggestions, I didn't post the code because it is very extensive (100k+ lines) computational code. What struck me the most was that < works but not > or == –  madness Jan 10 '11 at 9:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

countd is a local variable to a function. As such, its value it not necessarily retained between calls, unless you add the "save" attribute to the declaration. Try this and see if the code starts behaving. And how do you initialize countd? I would use the following:

integer, save :: countd = 0

In this case the "save" is optional because it is implied by the initialization in the declaration.

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it turns out simply writing "integer :: countd = 0" works, but it is still beyond me why "==" in IF statement didn't work... thanks for all the help I will not try to digest it –  madness Jan 10 '11 at 13:33

If the variable was not SAVE'd, the behavior is undefined and strange things can happen. For some compilers, the value of COUNTD will be initialized to zero and the code will work as expected. For other compilers, you will get complete garbage every time you call this subroutine.

Other times (which I suspect is your case), the variable is put on the stack and MAY get assigned the same memory each time the subroutine is called. Or, it may get assigned the same memory the first 4 or 5 times, then some other subroutine corrupts the stack on the 6th time and the value of COUNTD becomes garbage.

The correct answer is to SAVE the variable and initialize it with a data statement. This is portable and will work on every system.

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