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I have something like a sort-algorithm here, and I want to pass it a functor, which provides the sorting criteria (std::binary_function). So it should call T.operator<() for example if std::less is given.

Problem is, the member function operator() is not virtual. So I need to know which type of object was given, to perform a dynamic cast which is not really nice.

Regards,

Dennis

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Problem is, the member function operator() is not virtual. So I need to know which type of object was given, to perform a dynamic cast which is not really nice.

Why do you want to perform a dynamic cast? Normally you don’t need that. Just call the functor’s operator() just like you would call a normal function.

The whole point of a functor is that they behave like normal functions and you’re passing a template parameter into your algorithm (aren’t you?) to handle different functor (and function) types.

Of course, this whole thing is predicated on the fact that you are actually passing a template parameter into your function. std::binary_function is not suited as a virtual base class. It merely exists to define a few handy typedefs. Thus, your function declaration should look like this:

template <typename TBinaryFunction>
void your_algorithm(rest of parameters …, TBinaryFunction f);
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i do not want to use dynamic_cast... but i also cant use operator() because in the local context, it's binary_function which has no operator() defined. afaik you have to overload it first to use it... –  Dennis Jan 5 '11 at 15:23
2  
@Dennis: then you are misusing binary_function. As I said in my answer, it was never meant to act as a polymorphic base class. It merely defines a few useful typedefs, nothing more. You cannot meaningfully pass a binary_function into another function, this isn’t supposed to work. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 5 '11 at 15:27
    
ok thx.may you povide an example? (link?) i intended to use binary_function as an unspecified superclass so that every compare-functor from the STL can be used... i do not really understand how to use a template here. –  Dennis Jan 5 '11 at 15:29
    
@Dennis: you must use templates here, otherwise this cannot work. parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html#faq-33.14 has an example function named myCode that takes a functor (they call it “functionoid”) as a template parameter. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 5 '11 at 16:56

Can't you pass your functor as a template parameter, so to have static polymorphism?

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Pretty sure that this particular use of templates is not static polymorphism. –  Puppy Jan 5 '11 at 16:43

You can use Qt Signal and Slots or you can use Boost.Function

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