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We have two DIVs, one embedded in the other. If the outer DIV is not positioned absolute then the inner DIV, which is positioned absolute, does not obey the overflow hidden of the outer DIV (example).

Is there any chance to make the inner DIV obey the overflow hidden of the outer DIV without setting the outer DIV to position absolute (cause that will muck up our complete layout)? Also position relative for our inner DIV isn't an option as we need to "grow out" of a table TD (exmple).

Are there any other options?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 97 down vote accepted

Make outer <div> to position: relative and inner <div> to position: absolute. It should work for you.

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Thanks to you both. I always thought position:relative is the default. I just learned that static is the default. I accept shankhans answer as both answers are equivalent and shankhan needs some more points ;-) –  Zardoz Jan 5 '11 at 15:38
    
@Zardoz: Thanks –  shankhan Jan 6 '11 at 5:34
2  
You NINJA, you. –  Nick Wiggill Oct 24 '12 at 21:59
    
Thank you this was perfect. –  Sean Anderson Apr 15 at 18:00

What about position: relative for the outer div? In the example that hides the inner one. It also won't move it in its layout since you don't specify a top or left.

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You just make divs like this:

<div style="width:100px; height: 100px; border:1px solid; overflow:hidden; ">
    <br/>
    <div style="position:inherit; width: 200px; height:200px; background:yellow;">
        <br/>
        <div style="position:absolute; width: 500px; height:50px; background:Pink; z-index: 99;">
            <br/>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

I hope this code will help you :)

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