Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My brain is melting today and i cannot think how to do this simple bit of code. numberList is a string of numbers seperated by commas like '2, 34, 10' etc.. when i request a random number i need to check if the string has the number, if it does i want to keep requesting a random number until the random number is definitely not in the string. i cant think what kind of loop i would do to get this to work:

Random r = new Random();

public int RandomPos(int max) {
  int i;
  do {
    i = r.Next(max) + 1;
  }
  while (!numberList.Contains(i.ToString()));

    return i;
}
share|improve this question
3  
What's not working about it? (I apologize for the horrible grammar, btw) –  Greg Jan 5 '11 at 15:35
1  
@Greg For one thing it won't work if a number e.g. '3' is part of another number e.g. '34' –  Ed Guiness Jan 5 '11 at 15:38
    
See my answer.... I think you just should skip the !, since he wants to take the first that IS NOT in the list. –  Tomas Jansson Jan 5 '11 at 15:38
    
Beware - Contains will give false positives here; "4,20,7" contains "2" for example. I would get the integers myself. –  Marc Gravell Jan 5 '11 at 15:38
2  
Why is numberList a String and not a List<int> (or HashSet<int>)? –  Jens Jan 5 '11 at 15:41

13 Answers 13

I'll just explain in text instead of code because I'm too lazy to write the code right now:

  1. Use String.Split to break your list into an array, then (if you need to) parse it into integers.
  2. Use Enumerable.Range(0, max).ToArray() to create a list of all the numbers you could select.
  3. Subtract the first list from the second.
  4. Randomly select an element from the final list.

This has the benefit that you don't need to keep picking things randomly and retrying in a potentially-infinite-but-not-really-in-practice loop.

edit: here's some code

string[] invalid = numberList.Split(", ");
var list = Enumerable.Range(0, max).Where(x => !invalid.Contains(x.ToString())).ToArray();
return list[r.Next(list.Count)];
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a good method when dealing with proportionally large numbers of invalid values (and generally a good clear method in all situations) –  Chris Jan 5 '11 at 15:47
    
There's a much higher chance that creating this large array and substracting the 2 arrays will result with a significantly larger amount of calculations. (assuming the random number generator is a proper one) –  Yochai Timmer Jan 5 '11 at 15:49
    
@Yochai Correct, this method is only best if there are a high percentage of disallowed values. –  Tesserex Jan 5 '11 at 15:56
    
I think your split needs to be modified. No Split that I know accepts a string. Try Split(new[]{',',' '},StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries) though. –  Brad Christie Jan 5 '11 at 17:28
    
@Brad Ah you are correct. I'm stuck in PHP land. I wish that overload did exist though. –  Tesserex Jan 5 '11 at 19:01

Remove the !

  do 
  {
    i = r.Next(max) + 1;
  }
  while (numberList.Contains(i.ToString()));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the simplest answer (though forgeting that numberlist is a string). –  Chris Jan 5 '11 at 15:46
    
Broken, unfortunately: for example, if numberList is "10,20,30" then this will never return any of 0, 1, 2, 3, 10, 20, 30 even if the rng produces them. –  LukeH Jan 5 '11 at 15:51
    
I'd give +1 except there's no check to see if it's possible to find a number that's not in the list. What if numberList has numbers 1-10 in is and RandomPos(10) is called? <devil's advocate> –  Brad Christie Jan 5 '11 at 15:55

Try it with this:

static string invalidNumbers = "0,1,2,3,4,5";
static Random random = new Random();

static int Randomize()
{
    var randomInt = random.Next(0, 10);
    if (!invalidNumbers.Split(',').Contains(randomInt.ToString()))
    {
        return randomInt;
    }
    else
    {
        return Randomize();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why do the retry? Just subtract the invalids from a range and then you only need to pick once. –  Tesserex Jan 5 '11 at 15:40
1  
I think that a while loop would be better than recursion on the basis that in extreme circumstances this could cause a stack overflow (depending on how it is optimised) which a while loop wouldn't. I'm not 100% sure about that though... :) –  Chris Jan 5 '11 at 15:42
    
@Tesserex : In this case it would work. But how would you subtract something like "0,5,9" from a range? Maybe I'm just too tired right now to see the solution =) –  Dave Jan 5 '11 at 15:44
    
@Chris: My thoughts exactly. The chances of a stack overflow grow with every added number to the list. –  Austin Salonen Jan 5 '11 at 15:44
1  
@Tesserex: I suspect it depends on what your input ranges are. If the likelihood of collision is low (eg large sample size and low prohibited size) then it may be more efficient to trial and error in general compared to the overhead of creating the valid value set. Of course if your chance of a collision is high (eg range of 1 to 1,000,000 where 1 to 999,999 are prohibited then you are almost certainly best off creating the "allowed" set. –  Chris Jan 5 '11 at 15:45

Providing a simple answer, you don't need Split(). This assumes no spaces between numbers, modify accordingly:

String modifiedNumberList = "," + numberList + ",";
do {
    i = r.Next(max) + 1;
}
while (modifiedNumberList.Contains("," + i.ToString() + ","));

edit: I believe BrokenGlass is also right, you shouldn't have the "!", removed from my solution.

share|improve this answer

Maybe this is what you want? I used a regular while instead since I think they are easier to read, and the only thing I think you get wrong was the !.

public int RandomPos(int max) {
  int i = r.Next(max);
  var intList = numberList.Split(',').ToDictionary<string,int>((n) => int.Parse(n));
  while(intList.Contains(i))
  {
     i = r.Next(max);
  }
  return i;
}

Assuming I need to split the numberList first to if they are in a string. That would make the third row look like:

share|improve this answer
1  
Can't use contains for partial match purposes, You'll need to probably .Split the string and do a .Find against the list. –  Brad Christie Jan 5 '11 at 15:38
    
There is a missing parenthesis on the while. –  vcsjones Jan 5 '11 at 15:40
    
Fixed both issues I think :) –  Tomas Jansson Jan 5 '11 at 15:43
    
First of all, if you're already creating intList ... use it in the loop. Second, I'd suggest: Dictionary<string,int> intDict = numberList.Split(',').ToDictionary<string,int>((n) => int.Parse(n)); ... For a much faster key search –  Yochai Timmer Jan 5 '11 at 15:53
    
@Yochai: Chances are that a plain array or list will be faster than a dictionary if numberList is fairly small. For a larger set of numbers a dictionary -- or better still a hashset -- would definitely be preferable. –  LukeH Jan 5 '11 at 16:03

A modification of @Dave's reply:

static string invalidNumbers = "0,1,2,3,4,5";
static Random random = new Random();

static int Randomize()
{

    var randomInt = random.Next(0, 10);
    var splitString = invalidNumbers.Split(',');

    while (splitString.Contains(randomInt.ToString()))
    {
        randomInt = random.Next(0, 10);
    }
    return randomInt;        
}
share|improve this answer

A couple ways to improve this:

1) Use a List<int> or something instead of a string to make your life easier

2) if max is small (say <1000 or something) generate the list of all possible values, order them randomly, and return numbers in sequence from that list.

As the number of "used" numbers approaches "max" you could end up in a very long loop before you get an unused number. For values of max over a couple hundred, this could actually be of consequence. This may or may not be a problem in your situation.

share|improve this answer

This code will cover all cases:

  1. "1,2,3,4,5"...
  2. "1, 2, 3,4,5"...

    private static int GetRandomNumber(string existingNumbers, int max)
    {
        string[] existingNumbersArray = existingNumbers.Split(new char[] { ',' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
        List<string> existingNumbersList = new List<string>();
    
    
    
    foreach (string number in existingNumbersArray)
    {
        existingNumbersList.Add(number.Trim());
    }
    
    
    while (true)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        int value = rnd.Next(max);
    
    
        if (!existingNumbersList.Contains(value.ToString()))
        {
            return value;
        }
    }
    
    }

You can even take out this part:

        string[] existingNumbersArray = existingNumbers.Split(new char[] { ',' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
        List<string> existingNumbersList = new List<string>();

        foreach (string number in existingNumbersArray)
        {
            existingNumbersList.Add(number.Trim());
        }

so it will not be called each time you call GetRandomNumber function.

share|improve this answer

My addition to all the other answers..

    const string invalidNumbers = "0,1,2,3,4,5";
    Random random = new Random();
    int value = 0;

    List<int> tmpList = new List<int>();
    foreach (var x in invalidNumbers.Split(','))
    {
        tmpList.Add(Int32.Parse(x));    
    }

    do
    {
        value = random.Next(0, 10);
    } 
    while (tmpList.Contains(value));

    return value
share|improve this answer

Edit: missunderstood the question for the first post, anyway, here is a recursive solution.

It seems better to keep the numbers in a List, but if it is required to follow the format you asked, here it is:

    const int MAX_ATTEMPTS = 10;
    Random r = new Random();
    string nlist = "2, 34, 10";

    public int RandomPos(int max_val)
    {
        List<string> used = nlist.Replace(" ","").Split(',').ToList();
        return _RandomPos(MAX_ATTEMPTS, max_val, used);
    }

    private int _RandomPos(int tl, int max, List<string> used)
    {
        if (tl <= 0)
            throw new Exception("Could not generate random number. Too many tries.");
        else
        {
            int rnum = r.Next(max);
            if (!used.Contains(rnum.ToString()))
            {
                nlist += ", " + rnum.ToString();
                return rnum;
            }
            else
                return _RandomPos(tl - 1, max, used);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

I realize there are a lot of entries, but I don't see any with some decent error checking. That being said, this will offer a few things:

  • Won't waste any effort when there's nothing to disqualify
  • Will only select from a range of possible choices
  • Will flag -1 if a number can't be chosen within the max range and not in the disqualifying list

So here goes:

public int RandomPos(int max)
{
    // compile the list of numbers we need to disqualify
    List<int> disqualified = numberList.Split(new[]{',',' '},StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Select(n => int.Parse(n)).ToList();

    // Nothing to check against, save the CPU cycles
    if (disqualified.Count == 0)
        return (new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond)).Next(max) + 1;

    // make a list of everything that's possible for a choice
    List<int> valid = Enumerable.Range(0, max).Where(r => !disqualified.Contains(r)).ToList();

    // return either a valid result, or -1 if there are no valid results
    return (valid.Count == 0 ? -1 : valid[(new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond)).Next() % valid.Count]);
}
share|improve this answer

.Split will do the work, the following code will work as well, just for fun (replace the line while (!numberList.Contains(i.ToString())); in your code instead of checking i.ToString() check ","+i.ToString()+"," PLUS the beginning and ending. You need to adjust it if you have a space after ","):

while (!numberList.StartsWith(i.ToString()+",")&&
      !numberList.Contains(","+i.ToString()+",")&&
      !numberList.EndsWith(","+i.ToString()));
share|improve this answer
// if numberList is large then use HashSet<int> rather than a plain int[] array
int[] nums = numberList.Split(new[] { ',', ' ' },
                              StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
                       .Select(int.Parse)
                       .ToArray();

int i;
while (nums.Contains(i = r.Next(max) + 1));
return i;

(You should also add a check to ensure that you don't end up in an infinite loop if/when numberList contains all the possible values that might be produced by the rng.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.