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Simple question, I was wondering, what in 2011 is the right way to size html tables? (containing tabular data, of course!)

Should the following still be the way to go?

<tr>
    <th width="45%">Name</th>
    <th width="10%">Author</th>
    <th width="20%">Description</th>
    <th width="10%">Rating</th>
    <th width="15%">Download</th>
</tr>

Or would it be better to give each column an ID (or class) and set its width with CSS?

Thank you for your input!

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1  
Yes, I would give each one a class and then.. well, you already pointed it yourself. –  Flack Jan 5 '11 at 15:39
    
@Flack class works, or ID might be better if the <th> was unique. –  JakeParis Jan 5 '11 at 15:42
    
Why? Because then you don't have to type all 5 characters in "class" ! –  JakeParis Jan 5 '11 at 15:43
    
@JMC Creative, you have a really perverted mind :) –  Flack Jan 5 '11 at 15:53
    
@Flack $perverted = 'extremely brilliant'; Thanks! –  JakeParis Jan 5 '11 at 15:57
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've taken to using colgroup and col tags, like this:

<table>
    <colgroup>
        <col width="45%"></col>
        <col width="10%"></col>
        <col width="20%"></col>
        <col width="10%"></col>
        <col width="15%"></col>
    </colgroup>
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th>Name</th>
            <th>Author</th>
            <th>Description</th>
            <th>Rating</th>
            <th>Download</th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td></td>
            <td></td>
            <td></td>
            <td></td>
            <td></td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>
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Your solution, while similar to Carles', seem to set the width directly in the code rather than to having to spawn a heap of css classes for setting different column widths. Now, how right is that? (Which basically is my original question) I mean, technically it is setting presentation directly from the code (which is bad), but at the same time, its sole purpose is to organize content. (i.e. give columns the good width) That's where I get confused a little. –  Mathieu M-Gosselin Jan 5 '11 at 15:56
    
I don't believe in "the semantic web" or "Web X.0" in general, so it's never bothered me. I also don't do XHTML. –  Mark Jan 5 '11 at 15:58
    
I believe in separating markup, presentation and behavior on the client side, that's why I was wondering about that. –  Mathieu M-Gosselin Jan 5 '11 at 16:03
    
"Separate" is a really gray area. It all comes over HTTP, and it may have been "separate" on the server, and assembled for delivery. Where do you draw the line, and call one side "separated" and one side "not separated"? In the end, why does it matter? –  Mark Jan 5 '11 at 16:23
    
I meant that all behavior is a layer added on top of the "basic" site (and all contained within .js files) and so is presentation (all contained within .css files). The site can work without either (or both) enabled. That is where I would draw the line regarding content/presentation/behavior separation. That being said, I think I will go with your solution (though the W3C standard seems to indicate that width is the right attribute, not widcol) because here width="something" is used to manipulate content display for readability and not solely for presentation. –  Mathieu M-Gosselin Jan 5 '11 at 16:31
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You can use col or colgroup for that purpose.

<table>
  <col class="x"/>
  <col class="y"/>
  <col class="z"/>
  <tr>
    <th>ISBN</th>
    <th>Title</th>
    <th>Price</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>3476896</td>
    <td>My first HTML</td>
    <td>$53</td>
  </tr>
</table>

...and apply styles to the classes:

col.x {
   ...
}
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1  
+1 colgroups are great - and there are so many people out there who've never heard of it. –  oezi Jan 5 '11 at 15:42
    
+1. I always forget about them :( –  Flack Jan 5 '11 at 15:59
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In 2011? From about 2000 onwards it was the better approach to use class-names and CSS styles to give table-cells their width.

Unless they're all the same width, in which case just use:

th /* or td */ {
    width: 20%;
}

You could, conceivably, use nth-child too:

tr th:nth-child(1) {
    /* styles the first th of the tr */
}

JS Fiddle demo, using nth-child() css.

share|improve this answer
    
Better late than never. –  JakeParis Jan 5 '11 at 15:44
    
Amongst all the suggestions, the best to me seem to be colgroups or the nth-child. My concern is: how well is nth-child supported in modern browsers? (Does IE even support it? If it does, from what version?) –  Mathieu M-Gosselin Jan 5 '11 at 15:51
1  
Does IE even support it? ...hahahahaha...! Sorry. cough Here's Quirksmode's compatibility table, showing IE9 support, but not earlier. –  David Thomas Jan 5 '11 at 15:58
    
Thank you for the information. Sadly, it means I'll have to drop the nth-child alternative. :( –  Mathieu M-Gosselin Jan 5 '11 at 16:11
    
@Mathieu, no worries; one day IE'll catch up. ...probably. ...maybe. ...possibly. @JMC Creative, absolutely. –  David Thomas Jan 5 '11 at 16:36
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My personal preference is to use the width attribute on column tags.

<table>
    <col width="15%"></col>
    <col width="20%"></col>
    ...etc...

It keeps the presentation part out of the table content, so to speak.

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