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I have some std::vector and I have to resize it with some default value. Here is the code:

static int Counter = 0;
class Data
{
   /* ... */
   Data() { 
      Counter++; 
      std::cout << Counter << std::endl;
   }
};

std::vector<Data> mArray;

for (int i=0; i <= 200; ++i)
{
   mArray.push_back(Data());
}

// And resizing somewhere:
std::cout << "Resizing!\n";
mArray.resize(400, Data());

As I understand, after inserting 200 items, I can resize it with resize function which takes new size and default value for each new element.

When I run that program I see:

0
1
2
...
199
200
Resizing
201

Why does only 1 item is inserted after resizing?

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1  
to default construct 200 items, declare the vector as follows: std::vector<Data> mArray(200);. This will save you the loop! –  Nim Jan 5 '11 at 16:15
    
@Nim only for this case. In constructor there is also inialization of inner members for each object. And the data is different. –  Ockonal Jan 5 '11 at 16:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You're only seeing a count from your default constructor, when the entries being added are copy constructed. You'll have to add a copy constructor that counts copies as well:

   Data(const Data& other) { 
      // Actual copying code, whatever that may be
      Counter++; 
      std::cout << Counter << std::endl;
   }
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That's not likely to end well. –  Mark Ransom Jan 5 '11 at 16:14
    
@Mark: Why? Because there's no actual copying code there? –  Fred Larson Jan 5 '11 at 16:17
2  
copy ctor can be elided, so it's not necessary you will see any counting. –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 5 '11 at 16:27
1  
Because copying occurs for reasons other than adding new entries to the vector. You're likely to end up with a random mess. –  Mark Ransom Jan 5 '11 at 16:27
2  
@Fred: If he intends it to be used as instance counting, he will also need to decrement the counter in the destructor. Otherwise anytime the vector's allocated space is resized (and all the elements are copied), his "instance counter" will continue to increase despite the fact that he only has 400 non-destroyed objects (after the resize call). If he were to call any other algorithms (e.g. sort), the same thing would happen. –  Zac Howland Jan 5 '11 at 16:44

Because the default constructor is called once: std::vector copies its contents, so you're actually copying the same object 200 times.

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Because resize will use the copy constructor to insert new elements and for this reason, the default constructor is called only once.

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Because the other 199 Data instances are created by copying the Data instance that you pass to resize() via its copy constructor.

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You are printing out Counter++, not the size of your vector (since only 1 Data object is created to initialize the rest of the vector, it only gets incremented once).

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