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this might sound like a stupid question, but i want to clarify a concept: using netbeans 6.9, ive successfully completed a web application project using a glassfish container (locally). when i run the project, everything works well, except it runs on http://localhost:11494/myApp/. should'nt the accessing task be on http://localhost:8080/myApp/? when i type http://localhost:8080/myApp/, it doesnt connect to localhost.. neither does http://localhost:4848 to access the admin console. why is this? i think my concepts on deployment are not that thorough. i didn't manually deploy anything.. thanks in advance!

EDIT: right now, the university module im taking has lecture notes which specify manual deployment. id rather let netbeans handle deployment. perhaps this is the cause of the difference in port numbers?

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When you right click on the server in NetBeans and view the properties, what port does the Connection tab say? –  Preston Jan 5 '11 at 17:00
    
it says location: localhost:8262. which is weird as well.. btw, under the "sources" tab, theres nothing.. thats okay, rite? im kinda lost- everything works perfectly, except my concepts seem muddled up.. –  OckhamsRazor Jan 5 '11 at 17:05
    
All of your settings are in the domain.xml so you can look in there. However, that port (8262) should be your admin console, so you can view the settings in there as well. –  Preston Jan 5 '11 at 17:14
    
so far so good. okay, so 8262 is because it was configured that way. hmm, i cant seem to change it to 4848. i cant log in to the admin console either. all i did was install netbeans, and nothing of this sort, ever! ok forget all this, i checked domain.xml, and the settings seem to mention 8080 and 4848. but nothing about 8262 or 11494 written.. also, perhaps you shd write this as an answer, so i can accept it (seems to be heading that way!) –  OckhamsRazor Jan 5 '11 at 17:35
    
what os are you using? where is nb installed? where is gf installed? –  vkraemer Jan 5 '11 at 21:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All of your settings are in the domain.xml so you can look in there. However, the port (8262) your showing in your connection tab should be your admin console, so you can view the settings in there as well.

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I think port number 8080 is not assigned to your application, you can assign 8080 to listen to your application by making changes into server.xml, file all you need to do is add a connector or modify the connector entry to listen to 8080 instead of 11494...!!

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When you run the project, do you launch the server from within Netbeans? If so, I'd check there first. If you run from the command line, it has to be a GlassFish configuration issue.

If I got desperate, I'd grep my machine for "11494"!

Remember, the solution should be as simple as possible, but no simpler! ;-)

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He said he's using Net Beans –  Preston Jan 5 '11 at 16:54
    
DOH - corrected. –  HDave Jan 5 '11 at 16:54
    
thanks for the help guys, yes i do launch the server from netbeans, and checking the server properties reveals localhost:8262, i have no idea why. –  OckhamsRazor Jan 5 '11 at 17:12

I think port 8080 is occupied by another process, therefore Glassfish decide to use another port..

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i see. how about port 4848? how do i check this port 8080 process? –  OckhamsRazor Jan 5 '11 at 16:56
    
if you are using windows , you can check with netstat -ano | find "4848" ... last column shows process id.. –  Gursel Koca Jan 5 '11 at 16:58
    
thanks for your help. well, 8080 seems free, as does 4848. however, when i run netstat -and | find "11494", it does show that a process is running.. –  OckhamsRazor Jan 5 '11 at 17:10

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