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I'm looking for an overview of algorithms, you need every now and then. If there is a problem, you either do reinvent the wheel or spend a lot of time searching for an algorithm to a common known problem which has been solved a hundred times before.

Best one would be a website with sorted algorithms, like:

  • Compression
    • ...
  • Decryption
    • ...
  • Encryption
    • Symetric
      • ...
    • ASymetric
      • ...
  • Search
    • ...
  • Sort
    • Bubble Sort
    • Quicksort
    • ...

I think you get a feeling what I mean.

What pages do you know?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 26 down vote accepted

How about wikipedia's list of algorithms ?

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4  
Sometimes I'm scared that an answer standing right behind me is going to bite me, thx. –  Xn0vv3r Jan 20 '09 at 10:11
    
Great, thanx ;-) +1 –  Toon Krijthe Jan 20 '09 at 10:26

How about Dictionary of Algorithms and Data Structures from the NIST?

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This seems more useful for finding out what a referenced algorithm is, than (for example) trying to find out what encryption algorithms there may be. –  Stephen Denne Jan 20 '09 at 10:17
    
It has an index by area too nist.gov/dads/termsArea.html#crypt –  Pete Kirkham Jan 21 '09 at 9:31

You also have a good Wikibook on Algorithms, referred by many algorithms articles.

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There is a series of books, "The Art Of Computer Programming" which is quite comprehensive, if you want something in paper.

wikipedia entry

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1  
+1 High-level descriptions, low-level implementations, and the math pages make excellent pillows! –  luser droog Sep 22 '11 at 0:07

I would strongly recommend the book "Algorithm Design Manual" by Steven Skiena. It has the catalog structure you are mentioning.

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1  
As well as The Algorithm Design Manual, there's the online Stony Brook Algorithm Repository managed by the author, with the same catalogue structure as the book cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith –  MarkJ Mar 13 '09 at 7:43

This book is excellent:

The Algorithm Design Manual

This has been linked in other answers but is a good resource:

Skiena's Algorithms Lectures

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As well as The Algorithm Design Manual, there's the online Stony Brook Algorithm Repository managed by the author, with the same catalogue structure as the book cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith –  MarkJ Mar 13 '09 at 7:45

CLRS.

That is to say, the "Introduction to Algorithms" textbook by Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest and Stein.

It will give you a good overview of the most significant algorithms for most common purposes, along with a solid analysis.

A simple website/list would be a disservice if it inspired too-hasty "cut and paste" selection without a solid understanding.

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As well as The Algorithm Design Manual, there's the online Stony Brook Algorithm Repository managed by the author, which links to implementations. Both have an excellent catalogue structure.

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Princeton has some great public lectures by R. Sedgewick, (the guy who made left leaning red black trees and the book Algorithms in C)

http://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/spring11/cos226/lectures.php

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In addition to seconding The Algorithm Design Manual, I've had a very positive experience with this book:

Algorithms in a Nutshell

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As well as The Algorithm Design Manual, there's the online Stony Brook Algorithm Repository managed by the author, with the same catalogue structure as the book cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith –  MarkJ Mar 13 '09 at 7:45

Asking "Is there an overview of the most common algorithms?" Is just like asking is there an overview of common math or science?

Algorithms are problem solving techniques & applied mathematics used in many fields that require systematic approach to address complex problems such as these fields/applications:

Computer Egineering or Electrical:

Image processing algos

signal processing in general algos

Noise reduction, Analog to Digital

CS or IT:

Data management

security (encryption, intrusion detection)

Machine Learning

Finance,Operations Research, Econometrics:

Linear Programing

Dynamic Programing

Statistics Algos & Stochastic Calculus

Combinatrics

etc....

Just to name a few and scratch the surface

However most the specialized algorithms are derived from general cases encountered in CS, so to answer your question any book or tutorial that covers Introduction to algorithm should be fine.

Here is a least of common CS algorithms that I have encountered in academics & professionally 1)Sorting (bubble,insertion,merge,quick)

2)Search (dfs,bfs)

3)Data Structures & Algos that traverse data structures

4)Recursion vs Interation (Complexity of recursion should be studied , Master Theorem)

5)Trees (Binary,N-ary,Kd-tree,B-tree)

6)Graphs (Traversal via dfs,bfs)

7)Hashing

8)Common math algos (GCD,Exponentiation,different matrix multiplications)

9)Expression Trees (Building & traversal)

10) Overview of common encryption algos like RSA, AES, etc...

If you study what I mentioned above and know the time complexities (O notation) thats pretty much covers all you need to know for CS algorithms.

I recommend "Introduction to Algorithms" by Cormen , etal. MIT Press

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Most common algorithms is included on Boost. Here you can find the most common algorithms for sorting, searching or otherwise. Using algorithms is closely related to the use of a particular programming language. In addition to the above books, exists some good URL such Computer Science Video Tutorials.

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My defacto choice is Stackoverflow.com :)

Just search for keyword "algorithm"; you will gets tons of problems.

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