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I am trying to get MD5 encrypted pass from MySQL DB via Java code (Hibernate). But I cant get neither String nor any reasonable Java type.

The only thing I am getting is this unhelpful message: java.lang.ClassCastException: [B cannot be cast to com.mysql.jdbc.Blob (or whatever Java type I try cast to).

Here is my method:

public void testCrypto() {
        session.beginTransaction();
        // creates native SQL query
        // uses native MySQL's MD5 crypto
        final Blob pass = (Blob) session.createSQLQuery("SELECT MD5('somePass')")
            .list().get(0);
        session.getTransaction().commit();
}

Here is full stack trace:

java.lang.ClassCastException: [B cannot be cast to com.mysql.jdbc.Blob
    at domain.DatabaseTest.testCrypto(DatabaseTest.java:57)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.runTest(TestCase.java:168)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.runBare(TestCase.java:134)
    at junit.framework.TestResult$1.protect(TestResult.java:110)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.runProtected(TestResult.java:128)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.run(TestResult.java:113)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.run(TestCase.java:124)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.runTest(TestSuite.java:232)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.run(TestSuite.java:227)
    at org.junit.internal.runners.JUnit38ClassRunner.run(JUnit38ClassRunner.java:83)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit4.runner.JUnit4TestReference.run(JUnit4TestReference.java:49)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.TestExecution.run(TestExecution.java:38)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.runTests(RemoteTestRunner.java:467)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.runTests(RemoteTestRunner.java:683)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.run(RemoteTestRunner.java:390)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.main(RemoteTestRunner.java:197)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

That my friend is an array of bytes. In JNI, [B is used to describe an array ([) of bytes (B). An array of ints is [I etc.

You can get a bit more information on field descriptors here:
http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jni/html/types.html (section 12.3.3 should be what you are looking for).

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Thank you, you have been most helpful! –  Xorty Jan 5 '11 at 17:19

It's the class name of byte[].class. Try this:

System.out.println(byte[].class.getName());

Output (you guessed it):

[B

And if you want to access the readable name, use Class.getCanonicalName():

System.out.println(byte[].class.getCanonicalName());

Output:

byte[]

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[B is the encoded type name for a byte array (byte[]), which should normally only appear in type signature strings, as its not a valid type name.

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As the other answers state, that is a byte array.

If you want to get a string from a byte array, use the String constructor:

public void testCrypto()
{
        session.beginTransaction();
        // creates native SQL query
        // uses native MySQL's MD5 crypto
        final String pass = new String(session.createSQLQuery("SELECT MD5('somePass')")
            .list().get(0));
        session.getTransaction().commit();
}
share|improve this answer
    
great, but this is really strange behavior! This String is exact same as what prints mysql console. But pass.getBytes().length says its 32, and MD5 should be 128bits. Where did I lost clue? –  Xorty Jan 5 '11 at 17:21
1  
@Xorty: There is a difference between measuring encryption strength and the length of a String. MD5 will convert any input to a string that has no more and no less than 32 hex characters. –  Evan Mulawski Jan 5 '11 at 17:25
    
Great, myth busted ;) –  Xorty Jan 5 '11 at 17:30

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