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I have a php server that is running my domain name. For testing purposes I am running an asp.net on a dotted quad IP. I am hoping to link them together via either PHP or some kind of DNS/.htaccess voodoo.

So if I go to www.mydomain.com/test it redirects (but keeps the url of (www.mydomain.com/test) in the browser's address bar and the pages are served by the dotted quad IP asp.net box.

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Please tell us, which software you use for the web server! Apache? IIS? –  hop Sep 15 '08 at 16:35
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Instead of pointing www.yourdomain.com/test at your test server, why not use test.yourdomain.com?

Assuming you have access to the DNS records for yourdomain.com, you should just need to create an A record mapping test.yourdomain.com to your test server's IP address.

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It is quite possible, if I understand what you're getting at.

You have a PHP server with your domain pointing to it. You also have a separate ASP.NET server that only has an IP address associated with it, no domain.

Is there any drawback to simply pointing your domain name to your ASP.NEt box?

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The easiest way is to make www.mydomain.com/test serve a HTML file which has a single frame with the plain IP address. However, this means that the URL in the (awesome) address bar always stays exactly the same, even if you click a link on the displayed page. (You can avoid this by adding target=_top in the href, but this would require some modifications to your "asp.net".)

The only other way I can think of is to make www.mydomain.com act as proxy. That is, at /test it has a script or something that gets the page from your "asp.net" and forwards it to the client.

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You can do this with a proxy, but I think Will Harris's answer is the best - use a subdomain. Much simpler, and it'll get rid of issues with relative links as well.

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I agree that the sub-domain idea is the best, but if for some reason it doesn't work for you you could also have the php page at /test proxy requests to a URL at the dotted quad machine (using fopen to access the dotted quad URL).

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