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I am in the process of making my own namespace in JavaScript...

(function(window){
    (function(){
        var myNamespace = {
            somePublicMethod: function(){
            },
            anotherPublicMethod: function(){
            }
        }

        return (window.myNamespace = window.my = myNamespace)
    }());
})(window);

I'm new to these kinds of advanced JavaScript techniques and i'm trying to figure out the best way to call public methods from within my namespace. It appears that within my public methods this is being set to myNamespace.

Should I call public methods like...

AnotherPublicMethod: function(){
   this.somePublicMethod()
}

or...

AnotherPublicMethod: function(){
   my.somePublicMethod();
}

is there any difference?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The way I see it, if you use this you're using a direct reference to the object, whereas if you use my, the interpreter would need to traverse the scope chain until it finds my as a property of window.

But there may be arguments the other way as well.

EDIT:

I should note that since this is determined by how the function is called, it would require that the Activation object be that object.

So this would work:

my.anotherPublicMethod();

But this would not:

var test = my.anotherPublicMethod;
test();

If that's a possibility, then you should use my, or some other direct reference to the object. You could reduce the scope chain traversal by maintaining a reference to the object. Your myNamespace variable should work.


A little off topic, but I'd also note that your code won't work the way it is.

This line:

return (window.myNamespace = window.my = myNamespace)

...doesn't have access to the myNamespace variable.

Perhaps you meant something more like this?

(function(window){
    window.myNamespace = window.my = (function(){
        var myNamespace = {
            somePublicMethod: function(){
            },
            anotherPublicMethod: function(){
            }
        }
        return myNamespace;
    }());
})(window);
share|improve this answer
    
ha - good call! not off topic at all, I made a mistake when i was stripping my namespace for this question. Edited to work =) –  Derek Adair Jan 5 '11 at 19:48
    
yea exactly.... –  Derek Adair Jan 5 '11 at 19:49
    
I'm new to this whole using JavaScript instead of relying on jQuery thing... my brain hurts. –  Derek Adair Jan 5 '11 at 19:50
    
@Derek: Took a look at your update. Keep in mind that the return value of the inner function invocation is wasted since it isn't being assigned to anything. So you could remove return. Actually, the inner function isn't really necessary at all, though perhaps it is in your actual code? –  user113716 Jan 5 '11 at 19:52
    
@Derek: Regarding your last comment, I can relate. I've had many brain aching, cramping days over the last six months or so, but I'm so glad I've done it. –  user113716 Jan 5 '11 at 19:54

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