Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wondered about the best way to implement a correct, flexible and fast Equals in C#, that can be used for practically any class and situation. I figured that a specialized Equals (taking an object of the actual class as parameter) is needed for performance. To avoid code duplication, the general Equals ought to call the specialized Equals. Null checks should be performed only once, even in inherited classes.

I finally came up with this design:


class MyClass
{
    public Int32 SomeValue1 = 1;
    public Int32 SomeValue2 = 25;

    // Ignoring GetHashCode for simplicity.

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
    	return Equals (obj as MyClass);
    }

    public bool Equals(MyClass obj)
    {
    	if (obj == null) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	if (!SomeValue1.Equals (obj.SomeValue1)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	if (!SomeValue2.Equals (obj.SomeValue2)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	return true;
    }
}

class MyDerivedClass : MyClass
{
    public Int32 YetAnotherValue = 2;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
    	return Equals (obj as MyDerivedClass);
    }

    public bool Equals(MyDerivedClass obj)
    {
    	if (!base.Equals (obj)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	if (!YetAnotherValue.Equals (obj.YetAnotherValue)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	return true;
    }
}

Important ideas:

  • Usage of the "as" operator. This way we don't have to check for nulls in the general Equals. Wrong class types get reduced to null and will be sorted out in the specialized Equals.
  • Null check at exactly one point, even for derived classes.
  • Checking the attributes one after another provides a clear structure.

Are there flaws in this concepts, or did i miss any conditions?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your Equals method isn't reflexive when different types are involved:

MyDerivedClass mdc = new MyDerivedClass();
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
Object omdc = mdc;
Object omc = mc;

// mc.Equals(mdc) - true
// mdc.Equals(mc) - true by calling the right overload
// omc.Equals(omdc) - true
// omdc.Equals(omc) - false, the "as" in MyDerivedClass will result in null

The normal way round this is to use:

if (GetType() != other.GetType())
{
    return false;
}

See the docs in Object.Equals: "x.Equals(y) returns the same value as y.Equals(x)." Relying on overloading to give different results could end up with horribly issues which would be very subtle to debug.

share|improve this answer
    
I think both mc.Equals(mdc) and mdc.Equals(mc) return true here. While the former is as i would expect it, the latter is probably an actual, big mistake in the design. MyDerivedClass inherits the specialized Equals even though it is not supposed to be equal to any MyClass. –  mafu Jan 20 '09 at 11:29
    
Jon, should it be reflexive? mdc can contain more properties than mc so mdc can be different from mc but, from mc perspective, they can be equal. –  bruno conde Jan 20 '09 at 11:31
1  
Yes, it should absolutely be reflexive. See the docs for Object.Equals. –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '09 at 11:40
    
@mafutrct: You're right: mdc.Equals(mc) will return true. But mdc.Equals((object)mc) will return false. Will update the answer. –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '09 at 11:41
add comment

After implementing Jon's ideas, the code looks like this:


class MyClass
{
    public Int32 SomeValue1 = 1;
    public Int32 SomeValue2 = 25;

    // Ignoring GetHashCode for simplicity.

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
    	if (obj == null) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	if (GetType () != obj.GetType ())
    		return false;

    	MyClass o = (MyClass) obj;

    	if (!SomeValue1.Equals (o.SomeValue1)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	if (!SomeValue2.Equals (o.SomeValue2)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	return true;
    }
}

class MyDerivedClass : MyClass
{
    public Int32 YetAnotherValue = 2;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
    	if (!base.Equals (obj)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	// won't fail since base checks for type equality
    	MyDerivedClass o = (MyDerivedClass) obj;

    	if (!YetAnotherValue.Equals (o.YetAnotherValue)) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	return true;
    }
}

Still something wrong, or can i go ahead and replace all Equals in my code? :)

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd personally use "==" when comparing Int32s just for simplicity, and also implement IEquatable<MyClass> and IEquatable<MyDerivedClass>. Then again, I don't tend to find equality useful on classes used for derivation. –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '09 at 14:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.