Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to create an interface that allows any implementation class like this:

public interface MyInterface
{

   void doSomething( <A extends MyBaseClass> arg1);
}

public class MyImpl implements MyInterface
{
  void doSomething ( SomeClassExtendsMyBaseClass arg1)
  {
    // do something
    // SomeClassExtendsMyBaseClass is a class that extends MyBaseClass
   }
}

I get a syntax error when doing the above. Can someone show me how to accomplish this goal?

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted
public interface MyInterface<A extends MyBaseClass>
{

   void doSomething(A arg1);
}

public class MyImpl implements MyInterface<SomeClassExtendsMyBaseClass>
{
  public void doSomething ( SomeClassExtendsMyBaseClass arg1)
  {
    // do something
    // SomeClassExtendsMyBaseClass is a class that extends MyBaseClass
   }
}
share|improve this answer

@salexander has the solution, but the reason you have to do this is that your derived class is trying to be more specific which you cannot do. The reason is as follows.

MyInterface mi = new MyImpl();
mi.doSomething(new MyOtherClassWhichExtendsMyBaseClass());

In the interface you said you can take ANY MyBaseClass, so you have to honour that.

In @salexander's solution the code would look like.

MyInterface<SomeClassExtendsMyBaseClass> mi = new MyImpl();
mi.doSomething(new MyOtherClassWhichExtendsMyBaseClass()); // compile error.
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the explanation. – jaydel Jan 5 '11 at 20:12

it should be

 <T extends MyBaseClass> void doSomething(T arg1);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - This is the best solution if the generic type is strictly confined to the one method. – Jeremy Heiler Jan 5 '11 at 20:14
    
There isn't any point in making the method take an argument of type T extends MyBaseClass unless you need to do something else with T, such as return an object of type T or constrain another parameter using that type. As it is, void doSomething(MyBaseClass arg1) would be more appropriate. Additionally, the OP clearly wants implementations of his interface to be able to constrain the type of MyBaseClass the method accepts; generic methods allow the caller to specify the type. – ColinD Jan 5 '11 at 20:19
    
@Colin: "unless you need to do something with T" -- Isn't that what the OP wants? – Jeremy Heiler Jan 5 '11 at 20:22
    
@Jeremy: Generic methods such as in the example allow callers to specify the type argument. A void method with a single argument of type T does not do anything with T... it can only use the argument as an instance of MyBaseClass. <T extends MyBaseClass> void doSomething(T arg1) is just a pointless way of saying void doSomething(MyBaseClass arg1) as it is functionally identical. – ColinD Jan 5 '11 at 20:32
    
@ColinD obviously, it has to follow Liskov substitution principle. But I prefer not to make class/interface generic if one of the methods has to be generic, for the reasons that I do not know if developers are going to add more generic methods of different types. And that does not deserve a downvote. – Nishant Jan 5 '11 at 20:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.