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I'm looking for opinions and/or suggestions on this question. On our website we have bulleted lists of urls (they aren't listed in the same order nor do they contain the same exact links as one another). One link may be part of a number of bulleted lists, but not listed in the same place as in another list. I'm wondering if it would be beneficial to created a global list of urls and then access those variables for each url. Is this dumb, smart, or too much?

Example:

var link001 = "http://www.google.com";
var link002 = "http://www.yahoo.com";

<ul>
  <li><a href="<%= link001 %>'>Google</a></li>
  <li><a href="<%= link002 %>'>Yahoo</a></li>
  etc.
</ul>

I'm thinking the global variables would be stored in the global.asax, but I'm not sure since i'm not that familiar with the global.asax.

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Storing this list in separate XML (or resx) file would be much better idea. –  Victor Haydin Jan 5 '11 at 20:59
    
This might be one way to do it: blog.devarchive.net/2008/01/… –  Greg Jan 5 '11 at 21:03
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are going to store the link, then I would highly recommend storing them using semantic names, like so:

var GoogleUrl = "http://www.google.com"; 
var YahooUrl = "http://www.yahoo.com";  

<ul>   
    <li><a href="<%= link001 %>'>Google</a></li>   
    <li><a href="<%= link002 %>'>Yahoo</a></li>   
    etc. 
</ul> 

However, an even better solution would be to create a static class with constants (or readonly fields) which you can then access in code:

public static class Url
{
    public const string Google = "http://www.google.com"; 
    public const string Yahoo = "http://www.yahoo.com";
}

Which would then cause your page code to look like this:

<ul>   
    <li><a href="<%= Url.Google %>'>Google</a></li>   
    <li><a href="<%= Url.Yahoo %>'>Yahoo</a></li>   
    etc. 
</ul> 

This would be a much better way of encapsulating the concept of the urls.

As for the lists, you could easily expand the concept, like so:

public static class UrlList
{
    public static IEnumerable<string> List1
    {
        get
        {
            // Return the first list:
            yield return Url.Google;
            yield return Url.Yahoo;
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> List2
    {
        get
        {
            // Return the first list:
            yield return Url.Yahoo;
            yield return Url.Goggle;
        }
    }
}

Of course you could use arrays to back up the properties, but they are mutable, and generally, for something like this, that's not a good thing (another option would be to still expose the property as IEnumerable<string> but use a ReadOnlyCollection<string> as a backing field and return that, which would preserve the immutability:

public static class UrlList
{
    ///<summary>The backing field for <see cref="List1"/>.</summary>
    private static readonly ReadOnlyCollection<string> list1 =
        new ReadOnlyCollection<string>(new [] {
            Url.Google,
            Url.Yahoo,
        });

    public static IEnumerable<string> List1
    { get { return list1; } }

    ///<summary>The backing field for <see cref="List2"/>.</summary>
    private static readonly ReadOnlyCollection<string> list2 =
        new ReadOnlyCollection<string>(new [] {
            Url.Yahoo,
            Url.Google,
        });

    public static IEnumerable<string> List2
    { get { return list2; } }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That looks like a great solution. I'm really only looking to create the global urls, i'm not worried about the lists much. My question is, is this overkill or is it efficient? To be more specific about the lists, the lists will contain a mix of local and external links. Some to documents some to pages. Thanks! –  Helldozer Jan 5 '11 at 21:18
    
@Helldozer: With the global urls, I think it's a good way to go (obviously) because of encapsulation. You have all the urls in one neat place that can be referenced and changed if need be, with names that have an actual meaning. On top of that, you will see it's semantically similar to an enumeration, and those are in use everywhere and not considered overkill. –  casperOne Jan 5 '11 at 21:21
    
@Helldozer: As for the lists, I would still use the same approach, have encapsulated members, with relevant names for those relative urls and then your lists are like any other, you would name them appropriately and populate them accordingly. –  casperOne Jan 5 '11 at 21:22
    
I'm not completely new to programming, I have a few years under my belt, but I haven't tamed classes yet. I don't understand how the class works you posted. Thanks. –  Helldozer Jan 5 '11 at 21:39
    
This would go in the global.asax file, correct? Or is it the resx file? –  Helldozer Jan 5 '11 at 21:42
show 3 more comments

Some questions for you to think about?

a. What are the variables that determine which links go into a list and how often are these lists built?

b. Are the links likely to change while the web app is live? If yes, you should persist these and read them off either a database table or a flat file (like xml). Otherwise, if these are deploy-time values that don't change much during runtime, read them off a resources file.

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1) If the links are rendered in the same way across pages you can instead have a user control to render that and then use @OutputCache attribute to control the caching of the rendered html.

2) If the links are displayed in a different manner across pages and if they constrcuting them is a big process then I would rather store them in Cache.

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