Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is the code:

def make_dir(dir_name):
 if os.path.exists(dir_name):
  shutil.rmtree(dir_name)
 try:
  os.makedirs(dir_name)
 except OSError, e:
  print "ErrorNo: %s (%s)" % (e.errno, errno.errorcode[e.errno])
  raise

IFF the directory already exists, I get the following:

ErrorNo: 13 (EACCES)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "run_pnoise.py", line 167, in <module>
    make_dir("prep_dat")
  File "run_pnoise.py", line 88, in make_dir
    os.makedirs(dir_name)
  File "c:\Program Files (x86)\Python27\lib\os.py", line 157, in makedirs
    mkdir(name, mode)
WindowsError: [Error 5] Access is denied: 'prep_dat'

If I run the program again, it works, indicating that the program indeed does have access to the directory(s), since the shutil.rmtree call is obviously working. I have come up with a workaround which I will post. However, is there a better explanation and/or workaround?

My assumption is that the shutil.rmtree call is returning before the OS is totally done deleting all of the files and subdirectories. Also, since the shutil.rmtree call is not throwing an exception, any EACCESS (13) error on the makedirs call is likely bogus. My attempt (as modified after Apalala's comment):

def make_dir(dir_name):
    retry = True
    if os.path.exists(dir_name):
        shutil.rmtree(dir_name)
    while retry:
        try:
            # per Apalala, sleeping before the makedirs() eliminates the exception!
            time.sleep(0.001)
            os.makedirs(dir_name)
        except OSError, e:
            #time.sleep(0.001) # moved to before the makedirs() call 
            #print "ErrorNo: %s (%s)" % (e.errno, errno.errorcode[e.errno])
            if e.errno != 13: # eaccess
                raise
        else:
            retry = False

This seems to work reliably. There is the race condition problem mentioned in other posts, however that seems unlikely, and would probably result in a different exception.

share|improve this question
1  
I would expect that if the call to sleep() is made before the call to makedirs() the no exceptions should be raised. For debugging's sake, you could add a while os.path.isdir(dir_name): print 'still there' before the call to makedirs(). –  Apalala Jan 6 '11 at 17:00

3 Answers 3

I had the same problem, and this looks similar to my solution, except I was sleeping (0.1).

share|improve this answer

Can't you simply use an «except» statement ?

def make_dir(dir_name):
    retry = True
    if os.path.exists(dir_name):
        shutil.rmtree(dir_name)
    while retry:
        try:
            os.makedirs(dir_name)
        except OSError, e:
            time.sleep(0.001)
            if e.errno != 13: # eaccess
                raise
        except WindowsError:
#           (do some stuff)
        else:
            retry = False

It should work, no ?!

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand how this is materially different from what I proposed. What am I missing? –  anyoneis Jan 12 '11 at 1:22
1  
The except WindowsError will never happen as WindowsError is a subclass of OSError, so the previous `except OSError' will be triggered instead. –  Ethan Furman Jul 27 '11 at 19:49

In your previous post, you said the program raised a «WindowsError» exception:

WindowsError: [Error 5] Access is denied: 'prep_dat'

Your code can handle «OSError» exceptions using the «except» statement, but it cannot handle «WindowsError» exceptions... if you want to handle «WindowsError» exceptions, you must use the «except» statement like this:

        except WindowsError:
#           (do some stuff)

Note that you can handle any exception like this:

except Exception, e:
    # this code will catch all raised exceptions. The variable «e» contains an instance of the raised exception.
share|improve this answer
1  
This is incorrect. WindowsError is a subclass of OSError, so catching OSError will get both. –  Ethan Furman Jul 27 '11 at 19:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.