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I have a Singleton set up like this:

static Universe *instance;

+ (Universe *)instance { return instance; }

+ (void)initialize
{
    static BOOL initialized = NO;
    if(!initialized)
    {
        initialized = YES;
        instance = [[Universe alloc] init];
    }
}

- (id) init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil) {
        self.showHistory = YES;
    }
    return self;
}

but now I realize that I'd like to instantiate it from Interface Builder. I was thinking of just cutting into the init method like so

    if (instance) 
         return instance;

is this a bad idea? I'd prefer IB to pick up the instance already created in the +initialize method.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This can be done. There is a section about it in Cocoa Design Patterns by Buck and Yachtman.

In your case you could do something along the lines of:

static Universe *instance;

+ (Universe *)instance { return instance; }

+ (id)hiddenAlloc
{
  return [super alloc];
}

+ (id)alloc
{
  return [[self instance] retain];
}

+ (void)initialize
{
    static BOOL initialized = NO;
    if(!initialized)
    {
        initialized = YES;
        instance = [[Universe hiddenAlloc] init];
    }
}

- (id)init
{
  if(instance==nil) // allow only to be called once
  {
    // your normal initialization here
  }
  return self;
}

The nib loading code will then correctly pick up the singleton via its call to [[Universe alloc] init], and you can still use instance in your code as before.

The book has more detail and recommends implementing new and allocWithZone (both simply as return [self alloc];), plus error-reporting stubs to catch copyWithZone and mutableCopyWithZone attempts for good measure.

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1  
This is what I did to implement a plugin version of some networking client code that was originally in a Cocoa app. A coworker wanted it in a plugin so I went the singleton route so there'd only ever be one actual instance of the network client (internally). –  ExitToShell Jan 5 '11 at 22:31
    
@invariant, great answer the kind that makes me glad to have asked the question and not just dismissed it as dumb. –  Yar Jan 5 '11 at 22:44
2  
+alloc should return [[self instance] retain], because alloc returns an owned object. –  Dave DeLong Jan 5 '11 at 22:47
1  
@Yar it'd be an issue if you did alloc-init-release in code. You'd be releasing an object that you didn't own, eventually leading to accessing deallocated memory and a crash. –  Dave DeLong Jan 5 '11 at 22:54
2  
@invariant I just filed it on the Errata page: cocoadesignpatterns.com/errata –  Dave DeLong Jan 5 '11 at 23:18

That's going to leak. You can get away with it if you change it to:

if(instance) {
    [self release];
    return instance;
}

but it still smells a bit to me. I'm curious what use you have for singletons in IB; I suspect I would avoid this construct in my code.

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Hi Seamus, yeah, the code doesn't work anyway due to "This coder requires that replaced objects be returned from initWithCoder"... anyway, I'm going to checkout External Object in IB. The point is that I use one central Singleton as a bridge to all pieces of the app... so each piece registers itself with the singleton. But then I thought, why not wire some of them? –  Yar Jan 5 '11 at 22:10
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/350861/… –  Yar Jan 5 '11 at 23:13
1  
^^ love that confessions thread :) –  Nick Moore Jan 5 '11 at 23:37

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