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I understand why I cannot do the following:

private class Parent {
};

private class Child extends Parent {
};

private class GrandChild extends Child {
};

public void wontCompile(List<? extends Parent> genericList, Child itemToAdd) {
    genericList.add(itemToAdd);
}

My question is there ANY practical way to have a typesafe List where you can call add(E) where E is known to be only a Parent or a Child?

I vaguely remember some use of the "|" operator as used for wildcard bounds, but I cannot find it in the spec...

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liskov_substitution_principle says you shouldn't want/need to be able to do that. – ILMTitan Jan 5 '11 at 23:48
up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is not.

In add(E), the determination of the exact type of E could be made only at runtime. Any variable declared to be of type Parent can hold a reference to a GrandChild object, due to the subtype relationship; there's no way to create a list where you can't add objects of a subtype of the element type (at least, where such an operation will be prohibited by the compiler).

The real question is: why do you even want that? Perhaps your inheritance hierarchy is upside down.

share|improve this answer
    
Its a legacy problem. The Swing API is not generic, and requires lots of subclassing. Accordingly, in the the code I just inherited, there are lots of @Suppresswarnings for all of the rawtypes and unchecked uses of Lists of Listeners, JMenuItems etc. I was hoping improve the type safety of this code, and remove most of the @Suppresswarnings. – LogicVictim Jan 6 '11 at 17:51
    
That doesn't explain why you need to prevent GrandChild instances being added to the list. – davmac Jan 7 '11 at 0:50

Why not? All you need is a matching generic type for both the List and item arguments that satisfies both the calling parameters, you can achieve that pretty simply:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class TestClass {

  private class Parent {
  };

  private class Child extends Parent {
  };

  private class GrandChild extends Child {
  };

  public <T extends Parent> void compilesNow(final List<T> genericList, final T itemToAdd) {
    genericList.add(itemToAdd);
  }

  public void addSomeDescendents() {
    final List<Parent> list = new ArrayList<Parent>();
    compilesNow(list, new Parent());
    compilesNow(list, new Child());
    compilesNow(list, new GrandChild());
  }
}

EDIT: Sorry I missed the bit about excluding GrandChild... however, my example is a step further into how Generics can be utilized to make this scenario at least compile

share|improve this answer

You could create a facade and do your own instanceof checking before delegating to an encapsulated List.

It would be ugly and is most likely a horrible idea.

share|improve this answer

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