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Possible Duplicate:
How to get Url Hash (#) from server side

I have hash parameters in url

Can any body please help me to how to read Hash parameters value from Url using C#?

www.example.com/default.aspx#!type=1

How to read value of type?

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marked as duplicate by Samuel Neff, Jeff Atwood Jan 6 '11 at 4:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
do you mean for an ASP.net application? –  zsalzbank Jan 6 '11 at 2:37
    
the hash part is never sent to the server, so you're able to read it via javascript on the client. –  Pauli Østerø Jan 6 '11 at 2:42
    
possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/317760/… –  Pauli Østerø Jan 6 '11 at 2:43

2 Answers 2

The hash part is only used and available on the client. You cannot read it from ASP.NET / C#.

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  1. Split the URL at the hash (#).
  2. Then split the second element from above at each ampersand (&)
  3. Then split each of those at the equals (=) sign.

You will then have all the parameters and values.


If this was asking about a ASP.net application, you want to use Request.QueryString["type"] to get the value.

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1  
Values after # aren't passed to the webserver. for localhost/default.aspx#test, Request.RawUrl and Request.Url.ToString() return localhost/default.aspx. –  lukiffer Jan 6 '11 at 2:35
    
the asker wasn't really clear on how they will be using the code. this is how it would be done if the URL was passed to the program, not if it was running on a server somewhere and each request needed to read the parameter –  zsalzbank Jan 6 '11 at 2:37
    
type is not a querystring parameter, so you won't be able to access it with Request.QueryString["type"] in asp.net –  Pauli Østerø Jan 6 '11 at 2:41

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